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Locke
2003-Sep-23, 04:40 AM
Galileo. You could almost call it a cursed mission. It was 11 years late to begin with. The idea was concieved in 1977, and yet, it actually reached Jupiter and it's family of moons 18 years later. Galileo's main antenna jammed, crippling its ability to tell us what it found. A crucial recorder malfunctioned, and high levels of radiation scrambled the readings from its instruments. And to end it all, it was burned up in Jupiter's inferno. ``It's really thrown a lot of our theories just basically into the toilet,'' said Richard Young, a planetary scientist at NASA/Ames Research Center in Mountain View, which operated the probe. ``Right now, we're still sort of scratching our heads.'' He laughed and added, ``I must tell you, it was great fun.''

What are your opinions on Galileo's condemned story?

-Locke

imported_ROB
2003-Sep-23, 11:33 AM
HI LOCKE

I think its a shame the probe was burned up in the atmosphere could it not of continued to orbit at least from further out to avoid the moons or even catapulted out in to space to continue veiwing the heavens.

was there any sucess in the mision? and readings taken as it plunged to its death?
i hope so

rob :(

Dave Mitsky
2003-Sep-23, 12:15 PM
Despite the problems it encountered Galileo's mission was an extremely successful one.

The spacecraft was almost out of propellant and was six years past its mission lifespan. To avoid any potential contamination of the Galilean satellites the probe was deliberately aimed at Jupiter. For further information browse the following:
http://in.news.yahoo.com/030922/137/27xi3.html
http://www.msnbc.com/news/966496.asp?0cv=CB10#BODY
http://www.nasa.gov/vision/universe/solars...ileo_final.html (http://www.nasa.gov/vision/universe/solarsystem/galileo_final.html)
http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/galileo.html

Dave Mitsky

VanderL
2003-Sep-23, 04:02 PM
``It's really thrown a lot of our theories just basically into the toilet,'' said Richard Young, a planetary scientist at NASA/Ames Research Center in Mountain View, which operated the probe.

I was wondering which theories went basically into the toilet.

Locke
2003-Sep-23, 11:00 PM
I was wondering which theories went basically into the toilet.

Preliminary analysis of early data returned by NASA's historic Galileo probe mission into Jupiter's atmosphere has provided a series of startling discoveries for project scientists. Information on the extent of water and clouds and on the chemical composition of the Jovian atmosphere is particularly revealing. Probe instruments found the entry region of Jupiter to be drier than anticipated, and they did not detect the three-tiered cloud structure that most researchers had postulated. The amount of helium measured was about one-half of what was expected. These initial findings are encouraging scientists to rethink their theories of Jupiter's formation and the nature of planetary evolution processes, according to probe project scientist Dr. Richard Young of NASA's Ames Research Center, Mountain View, CA.

-Locke

georgejk
2003-Sep-25, 05:07 AM
Its sad to see the end of Galileo. But Science enthusiasts should be happy that the mission was successful and gave us earthlings much important data of planets around us.

Keep smiling bcause more exciting voyages are yet to come!!!!!!

Love to all in the forum

George J K

Duane
2003-Sep-25, 09:44 AM
Goodness Locke, I couldn't disagree with your description of this mission as "cursed" more!

On the contrary, this is the little robot that could!

In spite of all the setbacks, this was one of the most successful missions ever launched. It's arrival at Jupitor and the discoveries it made there came at a time when NASA, and the US space program as a whole, was reeling from a number of setbacks.

It's ability to overcome it's problems showed that NASA did have the technological prowness to handle complex missions in the face of daunting odds, and that ability was one of the few bright spots NASA could point to in those dark days.

While I am saddened at the loss of this craft, I am happy they could use it for one last hurrah. They did get some telemetry from Galileo's plunge, so even at it's very end, it came through.

A salute to NASA and JPL, congratulations!

This is a link to the Galileo home page:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/

DippyHippy
2003-Sep-27, 01:26 AM
I agree with Duane... and initially, I wondered why the mission couldn't be prolonged further, but apparently it had run out of propellant. I think sending Galileo into the atmosphere of Jupiter was a fantastic way for it to end it's mission :)

zephyr46
2003-Oct-17, 03:58 AM
I've said it before and I'll say it again, Galileo should never have been destroyed :( , it was the little ship that could, and did. The mission website has the best pictures of Io on the web. I wish it could have been refueled and repared. as future missions should be. It takes too long to get probes out that far to go wreaking them into planets.