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Markmus
2003-Sep-25, 02:43 PM
Hi All

I have for a long time been very interested in ion engines and their design.

is there anywhere except for jpl where it is possible to find schematics for this particular engine ? My interst in this is - how difficult is it to build one - and is there any danger in building and testing one.

Other kind of space propulsion technologies is of interest but where do I find not only information about these but also possible schematics of the construction of them.

regards
Mark

Colonel Custard
2003-Sep-28, 10:52 PM
Hey, I built a warp drive out of an old microwave oven & lawnmower engine. Anyone interested in the blueprints?

kashi
2003-Oct-06, 02:07 PM
Is that the same warp drive that I saw on Ebay?

Welcome to the forum Markmus! There are several threads devoted to propulsion here. Joining this discussion might help you find the information you are looking for:

http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.p...p?showtopic=516 (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=516)

Cheers big ears!

Kashi

Wiz187@juno.com
2003-Oct-07, 03:21 AM
I can't recall the exact edition but I remember seeing what I believe was a construction article in an old Encyclopedia Brittanica. This was around 1974 or earlier so I would start searching around there. What I remember of it involved a high voltage generator and a pendulum consisting of a horizontal metal spike with one sharp end and hanging from two wires (sort of a square U-shape affair). The wires were attached to a insulating wooden frame at the top. The power was pulsed to the high voltage supply and the spike would presumable accelerate a bit away from the sharpened end. It would reach the end of it's arc, swing back and the process was repeated again and again building the amplitude of the oscillation. Sorry this is so sketchy but I'm trying to remember something I really didn't pay much attention to from half a lifetime ago that I was was doing to pass away an idle hour in study hall.
Let me know if you can get anywhere with this (Wiz187@juno.com). I am an astronaut wannabe that couldn't pass the physical. I remember the entire space age from the launch of Sputnik (barely) and on and have kept reading about the cutting edge of things ever since.
I've collected a lot (over 315Mb, even when zipped) of information that I would be willing to share with anyone who wants it (assuming Juno let's me E-mail something that big). I figure if I can maybe give that one little clue that some budding genius needs then maybe I'll still get that stardrive invented and those starships built while I'm still young enough to go (hint, hint,hint).

Mike James
2003-Oct-07, 10:36 PM
I would expect any model ion engine to have high voltage electrons, ionized gas, and operate in a vacuum system. If you try to make such an engine you should be careful that back-streaming electrons don't make enough x-rays to be hazardous. (you might want to check your model with an X-ray meter when you turn it on).

Good luck.

Mike James

Markmus
2003-Oct-19, 08:41 AM
Originally posted by Wiz187@juno.com@Oct 7 2003, 03:21 AM
I can't recall the exact edition but I remember seeing what I believe was a construction article in an old Encyclopedia Brittanica. This was around 1974 or earlier so I would start searching around there. What I remember of it involved a high voltage generator and a pendulum consisting of a horizontal metal spike with one sharp end and hanging from two wires (sort of a square U-shape affair). The wires were attached to a insulating wooden frame at the top. The power was pulsed to the high voltage supply and the spike would presumable accelerate a bit away from the sharpened end. It would reach the end of it's arc, swing back and the process was repeated again and again building the amplitude of the oscillation. Sorry this is so sketchy but I'm trying to remember something I really didn't pay much attention to from half a lifetime ago that I was was doing to pass away an idle hour in study hall.
Let me know if you can get anywhere with this (Wiz187@juno.com). I am an astronaut wannabe that couldn't pass the physical. I remember the entire space age from the launch of Sputnik (barely) and on and have kept reading about the cutting edge of things ever since.
I've collected a lot (over 315Mb, even when zipped) of information that I would be willing to share with anyone who wants it (assuming Juno let's me E-mail something that big). I figure if I can maybe give that one little clue that some budding genius needs then maybe I'll still get that stardrive invented and those starships built while I'm still young enough to go (hint, hint,hint).
Hi there

I am sorry for the long delay in replying but I hope you are still there

I could set up an FTP so you could upload the file to me.

If so I will provide you with some more information to be able to upload it

Regards
Mark

Markmus
2003-Oct-19, 08:49 AM
Originally posted by Mike James@Oct 7 2003, 10:36 PM
I would expect any model ion engine to have high voltage electrons, ionized gas, and operate in a vacuum system. If you try to make such an engine you should be careful that back-streaming electrons don't make enough x-rays to be hazardous. (you might want to check your model with an X-ray meter when you turn it on).

Good luck.

Mike James
Hi

You got a point there but before I get that far I need some more info on this and off course I'm glad for your reply - this is the kind of hints I need to be confident of building one.

After all I'm not interested in frying myself :lol: got any more ideas tell me.

I'm aware that I should need a vacuum system to test it - only question is - where to get one - and not least the price of such a thing :huh:

Regards
Mark

zephyr46
2003-Oct-24, 01:43 AM
is there anywhere except for jpl where it is possible to find schematics for this particular engine

Boeing (http://www.boeing.com/defense-space/space/bss/factsheets/xips/xips.html)

Physic and Dynamics of current sheets in pulsed plasma Thrusters (http://66.218.71.225/search/cache?p=schematics+for+building+xenon+ion+propulsi on+system&ei=UTF-8&n=20&fl=0&url=_eUqgueYN9kJ:alfven.princeton.edu/papers/AFOSR-FTR02.pdf)
(It is in pdf format, no scematics as such, the link is to html format and seems to have a bug, looks interesting though.)

XIPS (http://www.angelfire.com/on2/daviddarling/XIPS.htm)

UCAR (http://www.ucar.edu/eo/staff/dward/sao/fit/electric.htm)

Crop circle Type engines ??? (http://futurepropulsion.members.easyspace.com/photo.html)