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imported_Draco
2003-Sep-26, 09:24 AM
But not the moons in our solar system properly? Or even Pluto!:D
If it can see supernova's galaxies, why not close up images of our planets and moons?

withaGee
2003-Sep-26, 06:55 PM
As far as I know, Hubble has given us great (!) shots of our local heavenly bodies: Hubble's spectacular veiws of Mars were recently circulated in the media (including UT) during the Close Approach, and Hubble recently discovered two previously unseen moons of Uranus (that even Voyager missed while in it was out there in that neighborhood!). Things that the sensitive "eye" of Hubble CAN'T do (without sustaining damage) is look at our Moon, the Sun, Venus (when it is near the Sun) and the Earth. -They are all too bright.

Delos D. Harriman
2003-Sep-26, 08:19 PM
The best images of Pluto also come from Hubble.

However, the problem with Venus is that the telescope can't be pointed less than 45 degrees from the sun because the sun is too bright (but this was violated once to look at Venus).

It can look at Earth, and actually does so for long periods of time for calibration purposes. (See Phil Plait's book Bad Astronomy or his website http://www.badastronomy.com

"I want to be the man in the moon." -- Delos D. Harriman, from "The Man Who Bought the Moon", by Robert Anson Heinlein.

TwAgIssmuDe
2003-Sep-28, 02:10 AM
Maybe its because much of our solarsystem has a lot of dark object, they can't reflect light, so thats why it may be hard to find fx. new moons. But objects out of our solar system like stars or nebulas have their own source of energy, which is detected by either light or infrared. That is maybe why its hard for hubble to see objects in our solarsystem:D

imported_Draco
2003-Sep-28, 03:26 AM
Well thanks guys....
I Thought it would be easy for Hubble to see our planets, but myabe becase of the light that the planets emit.

kashi
2003-Sep-28, 04:15 AM
That's not true...we can see saturn's moons for instance with an ametuer's telescope. Hubble has taken many wonderful pictures of the planets and their moons. Go to www.hubblesite.org and browse through their news archive.

The more exotic objects like nebulae, galaxies and supernovae just get more attention!

Kashi

imported_Draco
2003-Sep-28, 01:34 PM
Why can't it see Pluto then?
If it can see Nebulae and Galaxies, further away from our plaents, why can it not see Pluto?

Planetwatcher
2003-Sep-29, 01:56 AM
It doe's see Pluto, and even it's moon Charon. But the great distance and small size makes them almost as obscure and the best land based Earth telescopes.
It is not a lot different then trying to look at Exo-planets. It's just beyond current technology.

imported_Draco
2003-Sep-29, 09:45 AM
Well if Hubble can see so far out into this Universe, would it not be very easy to see Pluto? It can see further out into the Universe more than the diamter of the Milky Way, by the way, i think the name Milky Way is a terrible name for our galaxy:p
Anyway...it should be able to see right down onto Mars's surface?
Just a bit confusing, this powerful telescope, not being able to see Pluto, the closest image of Pluto that Hubble has ever seen, AFAIK, has pixels on it. But thats from a book about the Universe, its an encyclopedia i have.
Hope the James Webb telescope will provide us with better quality pictures.

Planetwatcher
2003-Oct-01, 08:44 AM
The problem with seeing Pluto isn't distance as much as it is lack of light.

Remember Hubble is looking mainly at stars, galaxies, and deep space objects which have their own light.

The planets, and moons don't have their own light, but reflect light from the Sun.
Mars is pretty close to us and the Sun, so it reflects a lot of light.
Same with most of the asteroids in the asteroid belt, although some with very low reflectibility are harder to see.

The gas giant planets although very distant have two things going for them for Hubble to see them,
1, Their size is huge making them easy to spot and focas,
2, They have a lot of reflective qualities in their atmospheres, such as clouds, or gases which reflect light well.

But now Pluto being the most distant of all major planets, so small that the whole planet couldn't even fill the North America contenent, and much less in reflective qualities makes for difficult and frustrating viewing.
Remember it is reflecting sunlight, which travels all the way to the planet, then back to us, so it's almost double distance.
And with us so much closer to the Sun which is trillions of times brighter proabley makes a little light pollution too.

imported_Draco
2003-Oct-01, 11:11 AM
Thanks for that:)

Dave Mitsky
2003-Oct-05, 01:17 PM
Originally posted by withaGee@Sep 26 2003, 06:55 PM
As far as I know, Hubble has given us great (!) shots of our local heavenly bodies: Hubble's spectacular veiws of Mars were recently circulated in the media (including UT) during the Close Approach, and Hubble recently discovered two previously unseen moons of Uranus (that even Voyager missed while in it was out there in that neighborhood!). Things that the sensitive "eye" of Hubble CAN'T do (without sustaining damage) is look at our Moon, the Sun, Venus (when it is near the Sun) and the Earth. -They are all too bright.


The HST has imaged the Moon on one special occasion - see http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/1999/14/ - but there's really little point in such activity otherwise. For further solar system images see http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/c...solar%20system/ (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/category/solar%20system/)

Dave Mitsky