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View Full Version : need a cosmologist to answer ????



nayland
2002-Sep-17, 04:09 PM
In my reading - which I admit is not extensive - on the subject of universe origins, one thought occurs to me.
It is hard to understand the big bang as an explosion ( explosions as I understand them expand into existing space ). However, all that aside... my question is - how ( or why ) is it that the solar system appears flattened... (the plane of the ecliptic.
the pattern appears to be repeated in galaxy formation with relatively thin, wide expanses of stars...
Is this phenomenon due to gravity alone? is it universal - or are there exceptions to this?
thanks

Silas
2002-Sep-17, 05:02 PM
As a general rule, almost everything in space spins.

When objects spin, they tend to flatten out. (I'm tempted to use the term "centrifugal force" just to irritate some of our linguistic purists! Grin!)

Really, it's no more than the generalized "pizza dough" phenomenon: when you spin the pizza dough, it flattens out...

(Sometimes, difficult questions have easy answers!)

Silas

P.S. Welcome Aboard!


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Silas on 2002-09-17 13:03 ]</font>

traztx
2002-Sep-17, 05:10 PM
I don't know either, but I do know that there are exceptions.

Globular clusters have millions of stars that buzz around like a swarm of fireflies. Here is
a program (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap020730.html) that demonstrates this.

Maybe the reason there are so many disk-shaped systems is because whenever there is a large mass in the center and smaller masses surrounding it, only a single plane is stable enough to last very long. We see rings around the gas giants too.

Or maybe it has something to do with one cluster passing another cluster,

nayland
2002-Sep-17, 05:18 PM
[quote]
On 2002-09-17 13:02, Silas wrote:
As a general rule, almost everything in space spins.

When objects spin, they tend to flatten out.

I guess my question was more along the lines of the cause of the original coalesence of matter/or whatever that imparted a spin. If some form of brownian motion in the original soup existed, would not the randomness of motion have precluded the formatiom of spin.??? Am I not phrasing this correctly? ... I am sure that some theory on the origins of the universe would explain what interactions were going on that led to the current interactions of mater as we "know" them today... I guess I am not really making this clear, Am I?

Russ
2002-Sep-17, 06:53 PM
Hey Nayland:

To go totally off topic, I note that you are from Yellow Knife. I haven't been there in (very many) years. Do you still have that little golf course where the crows steal your golfballs, and the greens are made of sand painted green? I loved that course! Every shot a sandy. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

I worked on the controls for some oil rigs that hadn't struck oil yet. Did they ever?
Take care in the cold. I guess it's already winter there. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

John Kierein
2002-Sep-17, 07:02 PM
We put an Iridium antenna in Yellowknife. It has a lot of continuos tracking time on it by now. I hope the 2 redundant ones are still working!

Wally
2002-Sep-17, 07:34 PM
On 2002-09-17 13:10, traztx wrote:
I don't know either, but I do know that there are exceptions.

Globular clusters have millions of stars that buzz around like a swarm of fireflies. Here is
a program (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap020730.html) that demonstrates this.

Maybe the reason there are so many disk-shaped systems is because whenever there is a large mass in the center and smaller masses surrounding it, only a single plane is stable enough to last very long. We see rings around the gas giants too.

Or maybe it has something to do with one cluster passing another cluster,


Wouldn't the fact that GC's orbit the galactic center outside of the galactic plane explain why they don't flatten out? They're kinda "snowballed" by the ever changing influences of the galaxy they orbit, aren't they? Just a guess on my part. Wally

nayland
2002-Sep-17, 07:54 PM
[quote]
On 2002-09-17 14:53, Russ wrote:

Do you still have that little golf course where the crows steal your golfballs, and the greens are made of sand painted green? I loved that course! Every shot a sandy. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif


Yep the course is still there ( I am not a golfer though) but of course they "cheat" on the course. All the players now get a little chunk of astroturf to carry around... find your ball, lift it up, put the turf down, then replace the ball and drive.
They cleared the top of the YK Inn last spring and discoveed almost 1000 golfballs.

The wells are finally going in in the Beaufort... People in Inuvik are being priced out their houses by the rising costs.
Tuktoyaktuk is loving it...

The Bad Astronomer
2002-Sep-17, 08:39 PM
Your best bet is to go to Sten Odenwald's web page about the solar system (http://itss.raytheon.com/cafe/qadir/asolsys.html) and scroll down to the links labeled "Formation and History". You'll
find everything you need there!

nayland
2002-Sep-17, 09:01 PM
On 2002-09-17 16:39, The Bad Astronomer wrote:
Your best bet is to go to Sten Odenwald's web page about the solar system (http://itss.raytheon.com/cafe/qadir/asolsys.html) and scroll down to the links labeled "Formation and History". You'll
find everything you need there!


Thanks very much