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Dave Mitsky
2003-Oct-27, 11:13 PM
Last night former Astronomical Society of Harrisburg member Bob Naeye (see http://www.melitatrips.com/bio_naeye.html for a biography) gave an extremely interesting and informative talk on string theory (certain forum participants may want to stop reading this at this point) to a group of ASH members at the Naylor Observatory. Bob has served as an assistant editor at Astronomy magazine and was until recently the editor of Mercury, the magazine published by the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. He will shortly join the staff of Sky & Telescope. He has also authored two books.

Bob began by discussing how the two great physics theories of the 20th century, general relativity and quantum mechanics, are incompatible and that physicists beginning with Einstein have been searching for a way to combine the four forces of nature (gravitation, electromagnetism, the strong nuclear force, and the weak nuclear force) into one overarching TOE (Theory of Everything). He then led into the thinking that has produced one of the great gambles of modern physics and mathematics, namely string theory, the notion that all matter and energy are manifestations of vibrating one-dimensional strings operating in higher dimensional space. He also explained the thinking on why gravity appears to be so weak, how dark energy may be explained in the context of string theory, and the concept of 'branes in fine fashion.

It was a fascinating lecture and Bob was extremely competent at portraying and explaining abstruse concepts. Afterwards Bob fielded some very intelligent questions from the audience and a long series of discussions about a host of matters ensued.

Dave Mitsky

VanderL
2003-Oct-28, 10:06 PM
Last night former Astronomical Society of Harrisburg member Bob Naeye (see http://www.melitatrips.com/bio_naeye.html for a biography) gave an extremely interesting and informative talk on string theory (certain forum participants may want to stop reading this at this point) to a group of ASH members at the Naylor Observatory.

Wrong Dave, I do like to hear (and see) scientific programs, although it is more entertainment when the talk is about string theory; I just don't understand how they get away with something as esoteric as that.

Dave Mitsky
2003-Oct-29, 08:10 AM
It is "entertainment" in your opinion, VanderL. Just as "electric stars" are a crackpot idea in mine.

Dave Mitsky

VanderL
2003-Oct-29, 11:53 AM
Fair enough Dave,

But as history tells us, "crackpot" ideas turn into established theories once in a while. In my opinion the Electric Star model explains all the features and data we see from our sun (and more), and therefore deserves to be discussed and studied. But we always need to remember that for a theory to be true, it needs to be tested and it has to be formulated in such a way that it can be falsified.

Menikmati
2003-Oct-30, 09:35 PM
The string theory is more of a philosophy in my point of veiw were others may disagree. But it should not be passed off and stored away in history books, so some 50 years from now it can be proven other wise (which has happend before in more then one case). I'm not to familar with all the theories but it seems to be the only one right now to bring all the of the 4 forces togehter and starting to turn wood into marble as einstein dreamed about.


I am new to this forum so please bear with me if I seem a little "behind" if you will.

here is some info about me

My name is George Clark, I live in newmarket, NH and I am 18 years of age. I have been reading books apon books about quatnam mechanics, astronomy, theories, etc. And now I want to be a professor in the the field of atronomy or cosmology but I am finding it hard to get into college because I have a GED =\.

*edit* I am not that great with grammer :(