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Argos
2001-Nov-28, 12:01 PM
On the 105th anniversary of his death I thought it would be cool to remember the great explorer of the southern skies.

Benjamin-Apthorp Gould, born in Boston, 09/27/1824, deceased in Cambridge, Mass, at November the 26th, 1896. Concluded his studies in Göttingen (having Gauss as master), obtaining his Ph.D. in 1848. In the same year he returned to the USA. In 1849 he founded the "Astronomical Journal”. In 1851 he was in charge of the coastal survey, when he used, for the first time in history, a transatlantic cable to compare measurements from both continents. Between 1856 and 1959, he organized the Dudley Observatory, in Albany. Interested in studying the southern sky, he wrote, with Agassiz (a Swiss astronomer living in the USA) as intermediary, a letter to the Brazilian Emperor Peter II (an amateur astronomer). His majesty directed him to the Plata estuary, in Argentina, close to the frontiers of the Brazilian Empire (that’s how the current Federative Republic of Brazil was called at that time), a mid latitude spot, with vast prairies which could provide an unimpeded line of sight close to the horizon, and a clear sky (at the time). Gould settled there. In 1868 Gould accepted an invitation from the Argentine government to install and direct the Cordoba Observatory, inaugurated in 1870. In 1877 he proposed the division of the constellation Argus Navis into three (Carina, Puppis and Vela). He remained in Argentina until 1885. His main achievements derive from his work in Cordoba, where, with four auxiliaries, he performed a detailed investigation on the southern sky. He reviewed ancient charts and established one himself did, containing these new data. "Argentine Uranometry" (1879) was the first work he published; followed the "Southern Zones Catalogue" and his "General Catalogue". The latter, also known as "Cordoba Durchmusterung", is an extension, to the southern hemisphere, of "Bonnes Durchmusterung", compiled in Europe. His work on the stellar agglomerates, specially the southern sky ones, were of great importance. Gould established a strip of young hot stars that circle the sky at a 20 deg angle along the Via Lactea, The Gould Belt


<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Argos on 2001-11-28 07:28 ]</font>

The Rat
2001-Nov-29, 04:22 AM
In 1877 he proposed the division of the constellation Argus Navis into three (Carina, Puppis and Vela).

Ah yes, the keel, poopdeck (sorry but I can rarely say that with a straight face!), and sail. Now I'm trying to remember the others, Pyxis, the compass, Sextans the sextant,... um... are there more?

Argos
2001-Nov-29, 12:37 PM
On 2001-11-28 23:22, The Rat wrote:
Ah yes, the keel, poopdeck (sorry but I can rarely say that with a straight face!), and sail. Now I'm trying to remember the others, Pyxis, the compass, Sextans the sextant,... um... are there more?



You are referring to the "new" constellations, most of them in the southern sky. The names of these constellations bring back to us the atmosphere of the great geographical discoveries, when Europeans reached to the exotic landscapes of unknown southern lands. There are hardly any mithological names left, only references to the real characters of the epoch (such as The Indian, The Peacock or The Bird of Paradise), the instruments which made possible the adventures (The Sextant, The Octant) and, later, references to icons of a technological era that loomed (The Clock, The Microscope). I present to you a list of the constellations (northern and southern) named in the modern times:

After 1600 A.D.

Apus (The Bird of Paradise)
Chamaeleon (The Chameleon)
Dorado (The Swordfish)
Grus (The Crane)
Hydrus (The Watersnake)
Indus (The Indian)
Pavo ( The Peacock)
Phoenix (The Phoenix)
Piscis Volan (The Flying Fish)
Triangulum Australis (The Southern Triangle)
Tucana (The Toucan)

By the end of the seventeenth century Hevelius added some more

Camelopardus (The Giraffe)
Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs)
Columba (The Dove)
Lacerta (The Lizard)
Leo Minor (The Lesser Lion)
Lynx (The Linx)
Monoceros (The Unicorn)
Musca (The Fly)
Scutum (The Shield)
Sextans (The Sextant)
Vulpecula [The (little) Fox]

By the middle of the eighteenth century Lacaille added some more

Aelum (The Chisel)
Antlia [The (Air) Pump)
Ara (The Altar)
Carina (The Keel)- From Argus Navis
Circinus (The Compasses)
Fornax (The Furnace)
Horologium (The Clock)
Mensa [The (South African) Table (Mountain)]
Microscopium (The Microscope)
Norma (The Square)
Octans (The Octant)
Pictor (The Painter)
Puppis (The Poop)- From Argus Navis
Pyxis (The Compass)- From Argus Navis
Reticulum (The Net)
Sculptor (The Sculptor)
Telescopium (The Telescope)
Vela (The Sails)- From Argus Navis

A remarkable constellations is Serpens (The Snake). On star charts it occupies two separate portions of the sky. One might think that there are two constellations of The Snake next to each other. Old star charts depict a man holding a snake. Modern maps have divided this ancient constellation into two: Serpens and Ophiucus (The Snake-Strangler).

The last constellation named was Norma.








<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Argos on 2001-11-29 08:41 ]</font>

The Rat
2001-Dec-01, 03:55 AM
The last constellation named was Norma.

Nah! The last Constellation named was "Star of America"!

http://www.airlinehistorymuseum.com/connie.htm


Sorry, couldn't resist.

;^)

Argos
2001-Dec-01, 09:46 AM
On 2001-11-30 22:55, The Rat wrote:

The last constellation named was Norma.

Nah! The last Constellation named was "Star of America"!



Thank you fellow! I love airplanes and the Constellation, a legendary plane. Cool.

The Rat
2001-Dec-01, 08:09 PM
Thank you fellow! I love airplanes and the Constellation, a legendary plane. Cool.

I tried e-mailing you this link just now, but your Hotmail is down. It's another Connie tidbit for you;

http://www.adastron.com/lockheed/constellation/racer.htm

Now that is something I would pay to see!

Argos
2001-Dec-02, 10:48 PM
On 2001-12-01 15:09, The Rat wrote:

I tried e-mailing you this link just now, but your Hotmail is down. It's another Connie tidbit for you;

http://www.adastron.com/lockheed/constellation/racer.htm

Now that is something I would pay to see!





Oh, boy! A beautiful bird. A racer Connie? I wonder where she must be by now...Thanks again, Rat!

Argos
2002-Sep-13, 06:14 PM
Hey Russ, if you can read this.

So you're going to Tahiti...

Take a look at this thread. Some info about the southern skies you are about to know.

Don't forget to send us Live from Tahiti your impressions about the southern skies.

Bon Voyage./phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Argos on 2002-09-13 14:15 ]</font>

John Kierein
2002-Sep-13, 10:14 PM
Interesting history. I did some work with the Dudley Observatory in Albany during Skylab. It's now moved away. They had two Principal Investigators, one working on micrometeorid detection and one on gegenschein and zodiacal light. That's where I saw the Surveyor mirror that was returned by Apollo astronauts. It was being viewed under an electron microscope to study meteoroid impacts.
I've also always wanted to meet Roberto Sistero who used to be at Cordoba in Argentina. He believed the red shift of quasars was due to the Compton effect, just like I believe, and published a Cordoba publication so saying. I was given a copy of it by Chip Arp back in the 70s when Chip was in Pasadena.

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: John Kierein on 2002-09-13 18:15 ]</font>