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View Full Version : Discussion: New Cassini Image of Jupiter Released



Fraser
2003-Nov-13, 09:00 PM
SUMMARY: The team responsible for the Cassini spacecraft's imaging system have produced the most detailed mosaic image of Jupiter ever created - the whole planet is visible down to a resolution of 60 km. The spacecraft took a series of 27 images over the course of an hour on December 29, 2000. The separate photos were then blended together on a computer to account for Jupiter's rotation and the movement of the spacecraft.


Comments or questions about this story? Feel free to share your thoughts.

kashi
2003-Nov-13, 11:27 PM
What can I say. This image is absolutely breathtaking. So crisp!!!! :o

Download the full resolution tiff (13 mb) from:
http://ciclops.lpl.arizona.edu/PR/2003K13/...PR2003K13A.html (http://ciclops.lpl.arizona.edu/PR/2003K13/PR2003K13A.html)

There are smaller versions there, but the larger one is worth the wait (it's a fairly slow server).

Kashi

kashi
2003-Nov-13, 11:45 PM
Just to add to that, imagine the pics of Saturn next year!!!!!! I can't wait.

DippyHippy
2003-Nov-14, 01:07 AM
You're telling me!!

It's a pretty amazing image... my mind boggles at what Cassini's cameras will reveal when it reaches Saturn next year. It's been a long time coming, but Cassini is really going to revolutionalise the way we look at the ringed planet :D

Fraser
2003-Nov-14, 03:11 AM
I was just listening to an interview about Cassini, and one of their plans is to take some close in pictures of the rings. Keep in mind that the rings are composed of chunks of ice 1-metre across and up which are only a few metres away from each other. A close up picture of this is going to be awesome.

Cassini rocks.

Josh
2003-Nov-14, 03:33 AM
How up close are we talking?

Man, these images are absolutely phenomenal. Jupiter looks like a couple of melted flavours of ice cream. Just bigger.

zephyr46
2003-Nov-14, 05:11 AM
WOW! I see what you mean Josh
Kashi, You can edit your last post :) you don't have to add another one.

SCHNECK
2003-Nov-14, 08:43 AM
The Great Red Spot of Jupiter is a discrete ammonia ice cloud,which is about twice as wide as Earth and exist for 300 years after the Maunder Minimum period of a particularly low number of sunspots at little ice age from 1645 and 1745(1).The length of the Jupiter Sun field is 41,68 light minutes(2).

(1)Great moments in Solar physics.
http://www.hao.ucar.edu/public/education/s..._moments.2.html (http://www.hao.ucar.edu/public/education/sp/great_moments.2.html)
(2)http://www.star.ucl.ac.uk/~idh/solar/cap/jup/vjuptr4.htm

Josh
2003-Nov-14, 09:21 AM
Jupiters red spot is looking very yin & yang like in that picture!

Haglund
2003-Nov-14, 04:13 PM
Originally posted by fraser@Nov 14 2003, 03:11 AM
I was just listening to an interview about Cassini, and one of their plans is to take some close in pictures of the rings. Keep in mind that the rings are composed of chunks of ice 1-metre across and up which are only a few metres away from each other. A close up picture of this is going to be awesome.

Cassini rocks.
I agree! I hope they go really really close so that we can see the individual rocks, that would be excellent, and of course a close up of the strange rope-like ring.

Charles Bell
2003-Nov-14, 06:10 PM
I can;t get the link to work:
Original Source: Arizona University News Release