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Scully
2003-Nov-16, 05:26 AM
Hi all,
I have 2 questions that I need to answer to complete an entry into an astronomy trivia quiz, if anyone has the answers please post a reply. Thanks in advance for all your help !!!!

Question 1
Which famous star is actually a visual triple in which each star is actually a spectroscopic double ?

Question2
"Cape Clouds" are what type of astronomical body ?

Cheers,
Scully

Josh
2003-Nov-16, 05:42 AM
I don't know the answer to the first one but ... as far as i know the cape clouds are the magellanic clouds and are the brightest galaxies that we can see with the naked eye.

Menikmati
2003-Nov-16, 06:34 AM
Hi Scully, I have two different answers to the first one and I am not sure if there correct so you may want to research them but either the Mizar or the Castor(if I had to pick one of the two, I would pick Castor). Like I said I am not positive and you may want to double check. Hope I helped you out.

AusJosh
2003-Nov-16, 07:24 AM
Answer to question 1 is Alpha Centauri (actually Proxima Centauri and Alpha Centauri A and Alpha Centauri B ).

Answer to question 2 is the small and large magellenic clouds which are in fact the closest galaxies to the milky way.


Hope this helps,


-Josh

Scully
2003-Nov-16, 10:28 AM
Hi all,
Thankyou very much for your prompt replies. I have completed the quiz and submitted it. I will let you all know how I go. Thanks again !!
Cheers,
Scully

Planetwatcher
2003-Nov-16, 10:20 PM
I don't think Alpha Centauri is correct for the first question. Which if read closely, is saying there are three stars you can visually see, and each of those three stars has a companion star you can not see. Implying a total of 6 stars but you can see only one with the naked eye, three with optical aid, and a total of 6 with spectroscopic equipment. I'd say the best anwser is Mizar, but I won't swear to it.

I hope Scully comes back and tells us what was correct.

zephyr46
2003-Nov-16, 11:46 PM
Castor (http://solstation.com/stars2/castor6.htm)

Mizar (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap970219.html)
a more detailed history of Mizar (http://leo.astronomy.cz/mizar/article.htm) including it's discoverer.

Aus Josh welcome :)
Rigil Kentaurus (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap030323.html), or Alpha Centauri is a binary with Proxima Centauri (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap020715.html) our nearest star suspected of being a third campanion. It is possible that Proxima may actually be a part of an unconnected Moving Group (http://www.solstation.com/stars/alp-cent3.htm). So unfortunatly Mizar is a double binary, a quintuplet if you include Alcor (a VISUAL Binary) , Mizar then is still only a quintuplet, visual and spectroscopic but not a sextuplet. Castor, a sextuplet, is resolved in the X-ray wavelength, I would lean towards it though. I've only heard about the cape clouds, I guess your all in consensus on them though :)

Guest_Scully
2003-Nov-17, 03:53 AM
Hi all,
After reading further comments and looking at the further readings, I tend to now agree with Menikmati and Zepher46 that the most likely suspect is "Castor". I have submitted another entry with this change now made. Hopefully I will find out soon what the answers are. As soon as I do I will post them. Watch this space.
Thankyou all very much for the advice, a little healthy debate is always great.
Cheers,
Scully

AusJosh
2003-Nov-17, 07:06 AM
I do apologise, i completely missed the second part to that question....

*shys away in embarrassment*


-Josh

Guest_Scully
2003-Nov-17, 11:15 AM
AusJosh or should I say "Effie", I'm not sure our international counterparts will get the joke, ( *shys away in embarrassment* ), but I enjoyed it. Wogs Rule !!!

Guest_Scully
2003-Nov-17, 11:37 AM
Hi all,
Seeing how everyone seemed to enjoy the last 2 so much I have another 2 that you all might be interested in.

1) How much does one tablespoon of fluid deep inside a neutron star weigh ?

2) Working from Flagstaff, Arizona, this astronomer was best known for his study of the planet Mars ?

I know the answers to these 2 so will let you know strait away if you get either or both right.

Cheers,
Scully

AusJosh
2003-Nov-17, 12:26 PM
I don't know.

Powell for number 2??


-Josh (who actually has greek blood in him.) :D

Guest_Scully
2003-Nov-17, 01:34 PM
Close AusJosh, but no cigar.
Cheers,
Scully

Menikmati
2003-Nov-17, 09:52 PM
gonna take a stab at # 1

100,000 tons?

Guest
2003-Nov-18, 12:17 AM
UT forum (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=558) on the subject :)

1 article with 10 (http://www.swintons.net/deodands/archives/000075.html)[SIZE=1]13

2 Comet Hunter?

Scully
2003-Nov-18, 12:19 AM
Sorry Menikmati, incorrect. It is somewhere in the billions of tons. I give it a little while longer to see if we get any other guesses, then I'll post the answers.
Cheers,
Scully

AusJosh
2003-Nov-18, 09:04 AM
Hmmmmm.....not Powell..... Surely not Eugene Shoemaker??


-Josh

Edwin
2003-Nov-18, 09:44 AM
I'm not getting involved in the weight question but the famous astronomer has to be Lowell

Scully
2003-Nov-18, 11:03 AM
Ed J, you got it in one. The answer to question 2 is Percival Lowell.

For the rest of you, one tablespoon of fliud deep inside a nuetron star weighs about 10 billion tons.

Hope you all enjoyed the questions.

Haglund
2003-Nov-18, 11:04 AM
#2 Percival Lowell?

DippyHippy
2003-Nov-21, 01:50 AM
I'm surprised no one got the Percival Lowell question earlier... he's famous not just for obsessing over the alleged canali on Mars, but also hunting for Planet X, before Pluto was discovered.

In fact, it was from the Lowel observatory that Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto in 1930

:)