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Fraser
2003-Nov-24, 05:15 PM
SUMMARY: Although stars can burn for billions of years, their final stages can take a relatively short period of time. In many cases, it only takes a few hundred thousand years for dying stars to slough off their outer layers to create the familiar planetary nebula. Since they happen so quickly, they're relatively rare to find, but astronomers think they've got a candidate with a relatively nearby star called V Hydra. The star is in its final stages, and jets of material have just begun emanating from it.


Comments or questions about this story? Feel free to share your thoughts.

VanderL
2003-Nov-24, 09:38 PM
I don't know if this star already has a companion, but chances are that is will have or it will get a companion (star or planet) very soon,
cheers.

Josh
2003-Nov-24, 11:52 PM
Are we likely to get a good show with this?

om@umr.edu
2003-Nov-25, 12:45 AM
Originally posted by fraser@Nov 24 2003, 05:15 PM
SUMMARY: Although stars can burn for billions of years, their final stages can take a relatively short period of time. In many cases, it only takes a few hundred thousand years for dying stars to slough off their outer layers to create the familiar planetary nebula. Since they happen so quickly, they're relatively rare to find, but astronomers think they've got a candidate with a relatively nearby star called V Hydra. The star is in its final stages, and jets of material have just begun emanating from it.


Comments or questions about this story? Feel free to share your thoughts.

:D Remarkable image!

This photo of a dying star :rolleyes: is a close match to the scenario we depicted for the birth of the Solar System!

See Figure 1 in "The Sun's Origin, Composition and Source of Energy", 32nd Lunar & Planetary Science Conference, Abstract #1041, Houston, TX, March 12-16, 2001.

http://www.umr.edu/~om/lpsc.prn.pdf

http://www.umr.edu/~om/lpsc.ps

With kind regards,

Oliver :D
om@umr.edu
http://www.umr.edu/~om
http://www.ballofiron.com
http://www.chem.umr.edu:80/facres/manuel.html

VanderL
2003-Nov-25, 11:05 AM
Oliver,

What is missing from the picture in your article, and what is obvious from the Hubble image, is the sharply defined structure that gives the Hourglass nebula its name. Any model should account for all the visible features, and I believe that electric/magnetic fileds are responsible for this shape, and might also tell us what is really happening to this star. I agree that it could be a solar-system-in-the-making, only the process should be viewed as a response the the extremely high Birkeland currents in space, through "fissioning" (ejection of the star's material) the electrical stress is diminished. Details can be found at www.holoscience.com, it is in several of the news items.,
Cheers.

om@umr.edu
2003-Nov-25, 02:21 PM
Originally posted by VanderL@Nov 25 2003, 11:05 AM
Oliver,

What is missing from the picture in your article, and what is obvious from the Hubble image, is the sharply defined structure that gives the Hourglass nebula its name. Any model should account for all the visible features, and I believe that electric/magnetic fileds are responsible for this shape, and might also tell us what is really happening to this star. I agree that it could be a solar-system-in-the-making, only the process should be viewed as a response the the extremely high Birkeland currents in space, through "fissioning" (ejection of the star's material) the electrical stress is diminished. Details can be found at www.holoscience.com, it is in several of the news items.,
Cheers.
Thanks for the response. :D

I agree that electric and magnetic fields may be responsible for this shape.

What is remarkable to me is that two well-known astrophysicists, Al Cameron and David Schramm, told me at the 1976 AGU meeting that stars could NOT explode in this manner. <_<

Well, a picture is worth a thousand words. :P

Now imagine that you and I are sitting near the center of the explosion, about 5 Ga after the event, creatures composed of supernova debris that are capable of making measurements. :rolleyes:

What might we observe then? :unsure:

ISOTROPIC BACKGROUND RADIATION THAT APPEARS TO FILL THE UNIVERSE&#33;&#33; :)

Proof positive of the Big Bang that made the whole universe&#33; :D

With kind regards,

Oliver :D
om@umr.edu
http://www.umr.edu/~om
http://www.ballofiron.com
http://www.chem.umr.edu:80/facres/manuel.html

VanderL
2003-Nov-26, 11:04 PM
Explosion is indeed the wrong term; it&#39;s more like a very ordered expulsion of material that keeps interacting and will organise into a solar system and depending on the amount of material available and the current density in the environment will become a star with planets, a binary pair or maybe even a pulsar. I hope the evidence won&#39;t take long to be detectable and verified.
Cheers.

om@umr.edu
2003-Nov-27, 06:49 AM
Originally posted by VanderL@Nov 26 2003, 11:04 PM
Explosion is indeed the wrong term; it&#39;s more like a very ordered expulsion of material that keeps interacting and will organise into a solar system and depending on the amount of material available and the current density in the environment will become a star with planets, a binary pair or maybe even a pulsar. I hope the evidence won&#39;t take long to be detectable and verified.
Cheers.
It is interesting how different perspectives influence what we "see." :D

You want to explain the physical geometry of an event observed with the Hubble telescope :unsure:.

In the mid-1970&#39;s Dwarka Das Sabu and I wanted to explain how a supernova (SN) could explode and leave the unmixed SN debris we saw in meteorites :unsure:.

Meteorites trapped "strange" Xenon with abundant light elements from the outer SN layers, and "normal" Xenon with abundant Iron and Sulfur from the inner SN layers ["Strange Xenon, Extinct Superheavy Elements and the Solar Neutrino Puzzle", Science 195, 208-209 (1977)] <_< .

:blink: From the observed link between primordial Helium and Xe-136 in meteorites, we proposed an axially directed SN explosion, leaving unmixed SN products in the equatorial plane surrounding the collapsed SN core.

The physical image the Hubble telescope captured of the death of a star :rolleyes: is remarkably like the event depicted in Figure 1 to explain the formation of the Solar Syatem from unmixed SN debris. :)

http://www.umr.edu/~om/lpsc.prn.pdf
http://www.umr.edu/~om/lpsc.ps

With kind regards,

Oliver :D
om@umr.edu
http://www.umr.edu/~om
http://www.ballofiron.com

VanderL
2003-Nov-27, 12:37 PM
I think you&#39;re right, what in conventional science is called the death of a star is in reality more like the birth of a star or the birth of a planet. And it happens very fast, one moment there is a star, the next is has a companion or a planet. To make ther point, most (maybe all) supernova remnants contain binary pairs of stars&#33;