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View Full Version : Discussion: Pluto Mission Will Study Jupiter Too



Fraser
2003-Nov-25, 06:57 PM
SUMMARY: Although the main goal of the NASA's New Horizons mission will be to send a spacecraft to Pluto, the mission designers figure they can examine Jupiter on the way out as well - and get a valuable gravity boost that would shave years off the mission. If all goes as planned, New Horizons would launch in 2006, and pass Jupiter in early 2007 (probably three times closer than Cassini did in 2000); it will reach the Pluto-Charon system in 2015. After Pluto, New Horizons would then be re-targeted to fly past a Kuiper Belt Object.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/new_horizons_study_jupiter)

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Cygnus X-1
2003-Nov-25, 11:52 PM
With the data collected by the Voyager and Cassini missions of the Jupiter system, another return by New Horizons seems a little ho-hum. Yet the latest technology abord NHM will surley provide spectacular images and data. That said, I find it refreshingly exciting to anticipate a mission to Pluto-Charon. The elusive pair have been shrouded in mystery and debate for a long time. I hope all goes well! 2015....ugh!

Haglund
2003-Nov-26, 09:40 AM
I hope that this probe will continue to investigate the Kuiper belt as well (in which I'm almost including Pluto, btw...)

DippyHippy
2003-Nov-28, 11:35 PM
I think it's fantasitc - a flyby Jupiter and within 2 years of being launched as well - bonus! :D

A shame it will take 12 years to reach Pluto, but then that's to be expected - Voyager 2 took 12 years to reach Neptune so I guess we can't realistically hope for anything sooner

superdog
2004-Dec-06, 08:17 PM
For fun I have been looking up diferent terraforming sites tying to find fun ideas for terraforming places like pluto. Yea I know you are laughing; but I was purchasing oneof those heatlamp hot dogs the other day and thought. Why not turn charon into a big heat lamp. We already know how to produce that kind of energy. The idea , set up a power plant on Charon that generates the enregy needed to shine a super heat lamp onto the surface on Pluto enough to where you could have a little water. This would also have the effect of helping to maintain and encrease the atmosphere on Pluto even as it gets farther away from the sun. You could also have solar colectors on Pluto that would utilize the Charon Super Lamp (CSL). that would then generate the energy colonists would need. I know this would mean perpetual daylight on one side and darkness on the other. To light the other side I propse a satelite that that would every 6-12 hrs would reflect light from the CSL on to the dark side and also every 6-12 hrs hours would eclips the CSL crating night for the lighted side. What do you all think

John L
2004-Dec-06, 10:22 PM
Originally posted by Parker@Nov 26 2003, 04:40 AM
I hope that this probe will continue to investigate the Kuiper belt as well (in which I'm almost including Pluto, btw...)
That's the plan. They intend to plan the fly-by to put the probe on course for an encounter with one or more KBO's, too. I don't think they've identified the ones they want to visit, yet.

antoniseb
2004-Dec-06, 11:01 PM
Originally posted by superdog@Dec 6 2004, 08:17 PM
Why not turn charon into a big heat lamp. We already know how to produce that kind of energy. The idea , set up a power plant on Charon that generates the enregy needed to shine a super heat lamp onto the surface on Pluto enough to where you could have a little water.
Even from a fun perspective, terraforming Pluto might be a bit extreme. I would think that what you'd want for people living on Pluto would be for the habitat to be a sort of giant house-on-stilts, like you sometimes see near beaches. If you build that, and keep it under glass, you wouldn't really need the heat lamp to be on Charon.

One of my big concerns with Pluto is the possibility that it is made of materials that will vaporize at human-life temperatures, leaving nothing but tarpits to build your dwellings in.