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Fraser
2003-Dec-04, 01:04 AM
SUMMARY: Astronomers have discovered a pair of neutron stars that could assist in the search for the long theorized "gravity waves", first predicted by Einstein. Separated by only 800,000 kilometres, the twin objects take only two hours to rotate each other. The theory is that the pair is losing energy in the form of gravity waves, and will eventually slow down and merge with a blast of energy. This new discovery tells astronomers that these twin neutron stars are more common than previously believed, and new gravity wave detectors should locate a merger every year or two, and not once a decade.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/neutron_star_binary)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

VanderL
2003-Dec-04, 08:51 AM
I think there is a big chance that planets are part of this "neutron star" binary system. Gravity waves will never be detected. The photon/rediation from these objects will be highly polarised.
Cheers.

GOURDHEAD
2003-Dec-05, 11:18 PM
Does anyone have a good reference that explains how the closely orbiting neutron stars generate gravity waves? Since the strength of the gravitational field is proportional to the distortion of space they cause, although the field has infinite reach, my guess is that the magnitude of the distortion at a distance of 100 times the separation between the neuton stars from the point about which they orbit will be indistinguishable from that of a single object of identical mass as that of the sum of the masses of the two stars. What is there about the mutual orbiting of these stars that is significantly different from a single rotating object of the same mass? From points at a distance, say 100 or 1000 times that of the separation, the gravitational field contribution from different configurations of objects should not vary, much less be detectable.

My view is no doubt wrong because I've not been exposed to sufficient data nor theories to know what I'm talking about. Help me understand. :unsure:

GOURDHEAD
2004-Jun-22, 03:27 AM
Does anyone have a good reference that explains how the closely orbiting neutron stars generate gravity waves?

No recent comments on this topic. Any new ideas out there?