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DogBo12
2003-Dec-06, 10:48 PM
OK, ive been thinking of this fr a while.

A black hole is an infinitly dense sungularity that may or may not open up into a white hole in another universe depending of what theory you want to believe. Some theories even talk about "mini" black holes that happen everywhere all the time micrscopically. The theories about these balck holes that i am interested in are the ones related to wormholes: an instant connection to anywhere in this universe and possibly others traveling instantly, faster than the speed of light. These are great until you look at the part where it says that if even one particle of normal matter (pretty much anything we know of) passes through this wormhole, it becomes unstable and collapses in on itslef and if gone, finsihed, destroyed. The theory says that it may be possible to stabilize these wormholes by pumping them full of "exotic matter."

ive heard talk about particles such as neutrinos being exotic matter with no mass but then they said "well, maybe it has a small mass..." and mathematical proof of gravitons but no real evidence. But the growing indirect proof of dark matter os growing and it is pretty much accepted that its there and we have almost no idea what it actually IS. We have some ideas on what it does, but not really what it is. It more than just all the plantes and brown dwarfs and the rest of the baryons that came with the widely accepted model of the big bang. something more is there that we dont understand, cant yet measure physically.

im certain that within the next century we will find out what it is and its exact purpose. But what will it lead to? Could this dark matter be the exotic matter needed to stabilize wormholes? I might just be way of base but i just got done reading The Light Of Other Days (excellent book) and i am just trying to see how far away we are from the world described in that book. A world with no privacy or boundaries (in space or time)

if im way off base here, please speak up so i can learn more about this as i have finally divereged from trying to learn the complexities of string theory and building a quantum computer so i am relatively new to this field of study.

thanks for the help

Matthew
2003-Dec-07, 02:22 AM
Dark matter could just be normal matter that doesn't emit light, and is so far from light that it doesn't reflect much at all.

It might not be some exotic material at all.

But then again it might be.

Littlemews
2003-Dec-08, 08:01 PM
My Astronomy teacher saids, Dark Matter is some kinda dust that block light to reach us on Earth...so only 10% of the Universe is clear, and 90% of the universe is undisciver (We call it the Dark Matter)

DogBo12
2003-Dec-08, 09:50 PM
the reason i conclude that it isnt regular matter that doesnt emit light/reflect visbale light because thats exactly what planerts and satellites are. With our best telescopes we cannot readily see other planets around stars because there is not enough light. But with the most generous estimates, (all of th planets in the universe veing much denser than we would normally consider) 355 of the total mass is still unaccounted for. So it is not any kind of regular matter that we know of (planets, satellites, asteroids, etc.) it is something else.

VanderL
2003-Dec-08, 11:45 PM
Most likely Dark Matter is nothing at all, it doesn't exist! And it doesn't have to, when the idea of gravity as the only force at work in the Universe is abandoned. When we take into account the influence of electrically charged plasma, there is no need for Dark Matter. When science will come to it's senses and realizes that space is not empty and that there is more to the Universe than just gravity, a lot of mysteries will be solved.
Cheers.

Haglund
2003-Dec-09, 12:05 PM
Dark matter is thought to make up about 90% of the total mass of the universe. Apparently it is one theory to explain why the galaxies are rotating "too fast". Some of the dark matter is simply baryonic matter that we do not see, but as far as I know it's not enough. Neutrinos make up an even smaller part of it. There might be more of the dark matter, maybe of a kind that we're not yet familiar with. Further observations will hopefully clear this up, whether there is some mystic dark matter or if we need to rethink our understanding of the forces of nature.

Matthew
2003-Dec-17, 11:02 PM
Some dark matter is not so "unknown", black holes would and do make up a part of the dark matter.


Most likely Dark Matter is nothing at all, it doesn't exist! And it doesn't have to, when the idea of gravity as the only force at work in the Universe is abandoned. When we take into account the influence of electrically charged plasma, there is no need for Dark Matter. When science will come to it's senses and realizes that space is not empty and that there is more to the Universe than just gravity, a lot of mysteries will be solved.

VanderL, I've heard something like this, but scienctists believed that it was the theory of gravity that needed changing. With their 'few simple changes' they could eliminate the need for dark matter to come into the equation.