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turbo86se
2003-Dec-13, 04:39 AM
Hello, this is my first post and I'm new to Astronomy. I recently purchased an Orion SpaceProbe 130mm reflector and I love it. If I understand this correctly, Saturn is out there for excellent viewing, and so is Jupiter. Will the full/half moon affect their visibility? I did get a SkyGlow Broadband filter as well as a Barlow eyepiece. What eyepiece should I use to locate these planets? My scope came with a 10mm and 25mm.
Thanks!!
~joel

Littlemews
2003-Dec-14, 01:29 AM
;) it depends on the right time to observer the planet

Hope this information might help u :lol:

Sky Calendar -- December 2003
1 Moon near Mars at 19h UT (evening sky). Mars at mag. *0.4.
7 Moon near the Pleiades at 12h UT (evening sky).
7 Moon at apogee (furthest from Earth) at 12h UT (distance 406,279 km; angular size 29.4').
8 Full Moon at 20:37 UT. The full Moon of December is called the "Moon Before Yule" in old almanacs.
9 Mercury at greatest elongation, 21 east from the Sun (evening sky) at 6h UT. Mercury (mag. *0.4) visible at dusk in the southwest about 8 below and to the right (left for southern hemisphere observers) of much brighter Venus (mag. *3.9).
10 Moon near Saturn at 22h UT (morning sky).
13 Moon near the Beehive cluster (M44) at 2h UT (morning sky). Binoculars provide excellent view.
14 Geminid Meteor Shower peaks at 11h UT. Produces bright, medium-speed meteors at its peak on the night of December 13*14 (up to 80 meteors/hour). The parent body of the Geminids is a mysterious asteroid known as 3200 Phaethon believed to be an "extinct comet." Unfortunately, bright moonlight will interfere with observations of the Geminids this year. The shower radiant is indicated on the sky map.
16 Moon near Jupiter at 7h UT (morning sky).
16 Last Quarter Moon at 17:42 UT.
22 December solstice at 7:02 UT. The time when the Sun reaches the point farthest south of the celestial equator marking the start of winter in the Northern Hemisphere and summer in the Southern Hemisphere.
22 Moon at perigee (closest to Earth) at 12h UT (distance 358,337 km; angular size 33.4').
23 New Moon at 9:43 UT. Beginning of lunation 1002.
25 Moon near Venus at 17h UT (32 from Sun, evening sky).
30 Moon near Mars at 10h UT (evening sky). Mars at mag. +0.2.
30 First Quarter Moon at 10:03 UT.
31 Saturn at opposition. Shines at near its brightest (mag. *0.5) with an apparent diameter of 20.7", its rings still tipped at nearly their most open.
All times Universal Time (UT). (USA Eastern Standard Time = UT * 5 hours

DippyHippy
2003-Dec-14, 10:32 PM
Generally, it's not a good idea to go "deep sky" observing between the first quarter and the last quarter moons - ie, around the full moon.

The Moon brightens the sky and therefore makes dimmer objects hard to see. So you'll see fewer stars and finding those deep sky objects, ie, nebulae, galaxies etc, will become difficult.

However, the planets are pretty bright so it won't affect the planets that much unless you want to go looking for their moons, which are significantly fainter.

As a side note, if you can find them, double stars aren't affected by the Moon at all. You can still split doubles during a full Moon... there's a reason for that, but I can't think of it right now :)

turbo86se
2003-Dec-15, 05:21 AM
Thanks for the help Littlemews and DippyHippy, I appreciate it. I really want to check out the other planets for now, but even if I can't see them, there's always something to look at!

~joel

Littlemews
2003-Dec-15, 08:51 PM
:lol: :lol: :lol:
Its good to learn stuff from those ppls in this forum....I do learn alot. :P

seeker372011
2003-Dec-16, 12:05 AM
Hi Joel:

I have a 130 cm-5 inch reflector-like you -and pretty much similar eyepieces, and observed Saturn last night before the Moon came up.

You can easily see the rings with your 25 mm,the image is tiny but should be extremely clear. (in fact you can make out the rings -barely-by straining through a 7 x50 binoculars).

With the 10 mm and then with the Barlow the image gets much larger but seeing conditions determine if you can make out more detail -for example the Cassini division.

(I couldn't resolve the Cassini division last night, but have in the past)

Of all the planets your first view of Saturn is the most likely to blow your socks off.

No picture or photo prepares you for your first resolution of a tiny speck of light into a disc with spectacular rings -especially using your own scope. Even sceptical wives have been known to acknowledge that maybe the money on the telescope wasnt mis-spent after this sight!!

Clear skies and enjoy!

seeker

Charles Bell
2003-Dec-16, 10:52 PM
Saturn is up well before the moon on the 16th.
Jupiter and the moon rise together on the 16th. The moon rises later each day about an hour per day.
Both Jupiter and Saturn and very bright and you be able to see them with either telescope or binoculars.
Jupiter rises around 11:30 PM. It is high in the sky at daylight and you can see it all the way through morning twilight.
You can download your own free astronomy planetarium program at:
http://www.stargazing.net/astropc/

Its what I use. It can control my telescope too.


:rolleyes:

Miketmbt
2006-Oct-04, 07:52 PM
Hello, this is my first post and I'm new to Astronomy. I recently purchased an Orion SpaceProbe 130mm reflector and I love it. If I understand this correctly, Saturn is out there for excellent viewing, and so is Jupiter. Will the full/half moon affect their visibility? I did get a SkyGlow Broadband filter as well as a Barlow eyepiece. What eyepiece should I use to locate these planets? My scope came with a 10mm and 25mm.
Thanks!!
~joel

Hi. I just bought this same telescope. I am also new. I was wondering if it is possible to see a galaxy or nebula with this telescope? Sorry if I am repeating a topic. This is my fist day here and look forward to learning alot from you all. THank you

redshifter
2006-Oct-04, 09:36 PM
There are many galaxies and nebulas you can see with a 130mm scope. Start with M31/M32, even though the moon will be out tonight you might still be able to make out M31 in Andromeda. For other galaxies, you should be able to make out M81/M82 and M51 farily easily as well as M33. In Leo, you should be able to see M65 as well as several others in that area. In fact, with 130mm you should be able to see most Messier objects, though many will be very faint and should really only be attempted in a moonless sky. As far as nebulas, M27, M20, M8, M16, M17 and M42/43 should all be visible, M42 will blow you away. It'll be up after sunset in a few months.

Madam Captain
2006-Oct-26, 01:13 PM
Another good thing to know about observing planets is wait for them to rise significantly before looking at them with your scope. The further up they are in the sky, the clearer they will appear in your scope. This is due to the atmosphere. If you look at planets when they are just rising, they will appear blury and distorted, however they will still be visible. On a very clear night, its possible to see several bands on Jupiter and the Cassini division in the rings of Saturn. In 2003, Mars was very close to Earth and I got to see the polar ice caps while observing. I love looking at Saturn and being able to spot moons around the planet.

Madam Captain
2006-Oct-26, 01:17 PM
There are many galaxies and nebulas you can see with a 130mm scope. Start with M31/M32, even though the moon will be out tonight you might still be able to make out M31 in Andromeda. For other galaxies, you should be able to make out M81/M82 and M51 farily easily as well as M33. In Leo, you should be able to see M65 as well as several others in that area. In fact, with 130mm you should be able to see most Messier objects, though many will be very faint and should really only be attempted in a moonless sky. As far as nebulas, M27, M20, M8, M16, M17 and M42/43 should all be visible, M42 will blow you away. It'll be up after sunset in a few months.

I love looking at Messier objects. M22 is another great one to look at - its a globular cluster in Sagitarius. However, I think the best globular cluster I have ever seen is 47 Tucanae (not sure on the correct spelling) Its amazing and I always get a kick out of that one.