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Rodina
2002-Sep-21, 03:26 PM
[if this story is aprocyphal, I apologize - but the story is as it was told to me].

A good friend got his Ph.D. in Chemistry from Cal Tech. Being close to Hollywood, about a couple times a month, the lab he worked in got a call from some writer or another looking for help with technical details.

One day, this fellow calls wanting to do a near-future techno-thriller, where the Japanese and Americans are at war with submarines trying to control the Marianas Tench (this was just after the Abyss, so of course, we needed more deep water adventure). So, my friend says, well... okay... just what can I help you with. And there were some basic physics Q&A, some questions about nuclear power (my friend thinks this is about nuclear propulsion and he's a Navy brat, so he's cool to talk subs). Cool.

Now, my friend asks: out of curiousity, why are they fighting in the Marianas Trench?

"Well, that's where the Heavy Water is, right?"

Mainframes
2002-Sep-21, 03:39 PM
ROTFLMAO

kucharek
2002-Sep-23, 06:50 AM
DON'T WRITE SUCH STUFF WHEN I HAVE MY MOUTH FULL WITH MY FIRST COFFEE OF THE DAY!!!!

Harald, working hard on his monitor and keyboard with some Kleenex...

The Shade
2002-Sep-23, 02:34 PM
On 2002-09-23 02:50, kucharek wrote:
DON'T WRITE SUCH STUFF WHEN I HAVE MY MOUTH FULL WITH MY FIRST COFFEE OF THE DAY!!!!

Harald, working hard on his monitor and keyboard with some Kleenex...


Ewwww!!!

g99
2002-Sep-23, 11:29 PM
Where is heavy water from? or do they artificially create it. Isn't it just water with extra hydrogen?

mallen
2002-Sep-23, 11:43 PM
On 2002-09-23 19:29, g99 wrote:
Where is heavy water from? or do they artificially create it. Isn't it just water with extra hydrogen?


It's water that contains the isotopes of hydrogen, deuterium and tritium.

Hydrogen has 1 proton and 0 neutrons in its nucleus.
Deuterium adds a neutron.
Tritium adds two neutrons.

Timm
2002-Sep-23, 11:45 PM
From The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/D2O.html) Page:

"Heavy water is chemically the same as regular (light) water, but with the two hydrogen atoms (as in H2O) replaced with deuterium atoms (hence the symbol D2O). Deuterium is an isotope of hydrogen; it has one extra neutron. Thus the deutrium atom consists of one proton and one neutron in the atomic nucleus and one orbiting electron. It is the extra neutron that makes heavy water "heavy", about 10% heavier in fact."

EDIT: I don't know if that's heavy enough to be found in ocean trenches, but I guess water currents and will make that impossible.

... and mallen was to fast for me /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_rolleyes.gif /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Timm on 2002-09-23 19:50 ]</font>

Rodina
2002-Sep-24, 01:13 AM
Does Deuterium constitute BOTH hydrogen atoms in a heavy water molecule? If I recall correctly, about 1 in 1800 hydrogen atoms is Deuterium.

Unless there's some natural reason that Deuteriums would stick to the same oxygen molecule, D-O-D rather than D-O-H, you'd get only about one in four million or so being Heavy Water, rather than one in 1800 (is there?). A big difference when refining it.



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Rodina on 2002-09-23 21:13 ]</font>

g99
2002-Sep-24, 03:13 AM
Thanks!! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

Senor Molinero
2002-Sep-24, 06:24 AM
Wasn't D-O-H discovered by Professor H.J.Simpson.

GrapesOfWrath
2002-Sep-24, 06:38 AM
On 2002-09-23 21:13, Rodina wrote:
you'd get only about one in four million or so
Nit pick: three million, or so

Chuck
2002-Sep-24, 03:28 PM
Since heavy water molecules are more dense than ordinary water molecules don't they sink to the bottom?

XPav
2002-Sep-24, 07:45 PM
Now, my friend asks: out of curiousity, why are they fighting in the Marianas Trench?

"Well, that's where the Heavy Water is, right?"

Well, you've got to give the guy credit. Increased pressure from greater depths means more concentrated stuff, right? So it gets heavier.

If you don't actually know what heavy water is, it's a decent guess....

nebularain
2002-Sep-24, 09:13 PM
Well, even if heavy water molecules did settle to the bottom of the ocean it would be rather unpractical to harvest it, especially from a place like the Marianis Trench, in which I know of only one small sub (http://www.diveweb.com/maritech/features/uw-wi99.02.htm) that was built to withstand such high pressures and actually made it to the bottom and back (with people inside).