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zephyr46
2003-Dec-19, 04:56 AM
I wonder if SIRTF ( sorry Spitzer Space Telescope (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=1477) :D ) will produce somthing like this ? :unsure:

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/9801/infraredsky_cobe_big.jpg

do you think the comet looking thing heading towards the center of the galaxy in this picture is the southern crown (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap021002.html) (picture from APOD)?

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0210/cra_aao_big.jpg

rajasun
2003-Dec-19, 06:28 AM
Spitzer Space Telescope otherwise and formerly known as SIRTF has produced the first batch of images now avaible for PUBLIC viewing and appreciation. Check out the Press Release and images at links provided for below.

DIRECT from the Mission's OFFICIAL website:
http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/relea...6/release.shtml (http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/releases/ssc2003-06/release.shtml)

The images:
http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/relea...6/visuals.shtml (http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/releases/ssc2003-06/visuals.shtml)

Quick Facts about the objects imaged:
http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/relea...uickfacts.shtml (http://www.spitzer.caltech.edu/Media/releases/ssc2003-06/quickfacts.shtml)


SIMILAR story and images:
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=13248

http://www.astronomy.com/Content/Dynamic/A...01/600ljodd.asp (http://www.astronomy.com/Content/Dynamic/Articles/000/000/001/600ljodd.asp)

B)

Matthew
2003-Dec-19, 06:52 AM
Well this looks a bit like your original picture:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/releases/2003/images/hh46-47-browse.jpg

And this one ain't bad:

http://ipac.jpl.nasa.gov/media_images/ssc2003-06b_small.jpg

Both from SIRTF.

Josh
2003-Dec-19, 07:58 AM
As a master of understatement I'd like to say ... Those pictures are rather good, aren't they?

Matthew
2003-Dec-19, 09:20 AM
I downloaded a few of the SIRTF images in full size TIFF, it took a while on my dialup connection, but it was worth it. So crisp! But it would be good if more images were released, at the moment there aren't all that many pictures. The Hubble has got a much bigger range of crisp images.

rajasun
2003-Dec-19, 09:27 AM
Those first images are indeed BREATHTAKING! Spitzer is zillion of light years (L.Y.) better than IRAS! The infrared sky sure compares well with its optical counterpart doesn't it? ;) Do check out the Formalhaut disk pics. They are simply AWESOME!

B)

enceladus
2003-Dec-19, 11:12 PM
Originally posted by matthew@Dec 19 2003, 09:20 AM
But it would be good if more images were released, at the moment there aren't all that many pictures. The Hubble has got a much bigger range of crisp images.
The images just released are classed as Early Release images taken just so that they could be released within three months of launch. Usually there is an embargo of about a year between when an image is taken with a space telescope eg Hubble to when it is released. This is so that the astronomers that spent their time and energy putting together the proposal for the image to be taken in the first place get to be the ones who make the discoveries.

These images were probably part of what is called Director's Time. The Director of the telescope gets maybe five days a year when he can point the telescope at anything he likes. This is how things like the Hubble Deep Field got taken. It's a reward for being the guy who makes all the important decisions.

You also have to remember that Hubble has been in orbit for over 10 years and so has had more time to build up a huge and impressive archive of images. The SST will hopefully do the same over its operational time though it is limited by the time it takes for the helium to evaporate. After this is gone it won't be able to take such good images, though it may be still able to some science.

rajasun
2003-Dec-20, 06:14 AM
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewpr.html?pid=13264

MORE on Spitzer's images. Analysis of and some preliminary comments on Formalhaut disk's inner regions by University of Arizona's Prof. Rieke.