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damienpaul
2003-Dec-21, 04:51 AM
I was wondering if the folks in here could please direct me to sources for information about planetary weather.

Matthew
2003-Dec-23, 02:36 AM
Space Weather (http://www.spaceweather.com/)

Space Enviroment Centre (NOAA) (http://www.sec.noaa.gov/)

damienpaul
2003-Dec-23, 03:03 AM
Thank yo for that, and what a great link!

zephyr46
2003-Dec-23, 03:10 AM
Sad isn't it :(

I wish there was at least a Jovian weather report once a month.

SOHO (http://sohowww.nascom.nasa.gov/)

The WIND-SWE Home Page (http://web.mit.edu/afs/athena/org/s/space/www/wind.html) (has a Java Applet (http://web.mit.edu/afs/athena/org/s/space/www/voyager/voyager_traj/traj3d/traj3d.html) showing the positions of voyager 1 and 2)

Matthew
2003-Dec-23, 03:44 AM
Thank yo for that, and what a great link!

Happy to help.

But unfortunetly there isn't as much soley on planetary weather. Those two websites looked more on space weather. We don't know all that much about the weather on other planets, we mainly study weather on other planets by looking at still images or movies taken thousands of kilometres away.

damienpaul
2003-Dec-23, 03:46 AM
probably far more accurate than what we can do for Earth on Earth!

VanderL
2003-Dec-23, 05:01 PM
Funny thing is that all planets with atmospheres have a very active weather system, no matter how small the input of energy from the Sun. Winds on Neptune are among the strongest found in the solar system and even Pluto seems to have weather. If nor from the Sun, I wonder where the energy comes from.

damienpaul
2003-Dec-23, 05:20 PM
internal energy, from reactions in the core perhaps?

Dan Luna
2003-Dec-23, 05:30 PM
My BBC "Planets" DVD says the atmosphere on the warmer planets is more turbulent and this slows the winds down. On the colder planets they just keep going round.

damienpaul
2003-Dec-23, 05:32 PM
very interesting....i assume turbulent in 3 dimensions, but where is the source of the wind on say Neptune as VanderL asked, internal sources?

Dan Luna
2003-Dec-23, 05:43 PM
I suppose the atmosphere would lag behind the spin of any planet, but now I'll have to go hunting for the answer.

damienpaul
2003-Dec-23, 05:44 PM
yes, of course, as the Gas Giants have a much greater spin velocity!!!!!

VanderL
2003-Dec-23, 05:48 PM
Internal energy doesn't seem very likely. It would mean that the surface temperature of Neptune should be very high. By the way, the winds are strongest in the outer atmosphere layers, which would also be very hard to explain with internal energy.
Turbulence keeping the wind velocity down? That's a new one, hadn't heard it before. That would mean that the inner planets have a turbulent atmosphere and the outer planets would have a "stratified" atmosphere,. I'm not sure, but doesn't Saturn have big storms in it's atmosphere, like the Red Spot (or whatever it is named) on Jupiter?

damienpaul
2003-Dec-23, 05:54 PM
i'd place my money on the fast rotation of the Outer Gas Giants....

Dan Luna
2003-Dec-23, 05:58 PM
It seems a bit of a mystery really, this article suggests heat due to gravitational contraction:

http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/May20...50406.As.r.html (http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/May2003/1053650406.As.r.html)

VanderL
2003-Dec-23, 06:26 PM
Thanks,

In fact in the article it is said that internal energy by gravitational contraction causes the high winds on Neptune and all the other gas giants. I'm not aware of any direct temperature measurements that confirms this. Did any of the probes that were dropped in Jupiter record temperature measurements?

damienpaul
2003-Dec-23, 06:28 PM
so to summarise...in my mind there are 3 possibilities:

1. gravitational contraction
2. fast rotation
3. the biggest cooking festival in the solar system!!! :lol:

VanderL
2003-Dec-23, 06:39 PM
Here http://library.thinkquest.org/18188/englis...3.htm?tqskip1=1 (http://library.thinkquest.org/18188/english/planets/neptune/neptune3.htm?tqskip1=1)
it is said that not only are the winds 2400 km/s, but they are also retrograde. I know what they must have been eating at the festival!

damienpaul
2003-Dec-23, 06:45 PM
yes, waaaay to much baked beans! and in the wrong direction! :lol:

Wow, what a planet and its baked bean eating inhabitants!!

this is an interesting conundrum! possible internal source - clearly it looks to be pretty darn turbulent in the atmosphere...hmmm

VanderL
2003-Dec-23, 07:40 PM
Extremely cold turbulence; it seems to be -220 degrees Celsius on Neptune. What weather system could thrive on an internal heat source producing such a small amount of heat?
It's almost like the weather systems have little to do with the planets, or their distance to the Sun.
Rotation is indeed something to consider; Jupiter, Neptune and Uranus (retrograde) rotate quite fast, but it won't fit. Venus "rotates" once every 240 something days (retrograde as well, could they be having the Neptune party together with Uranians?), and is hotter than hell.
Cheers.

Matthew
2003-Dec-24, 01:14 AM
Venus's atmosphere would be powered by the massive amount of heat the planet has.

damienpaul
2003-Dec-24, 02:11 AM
Which leaves the quandry of the Outer Planets, just how are those huge wind speeds and storms started and mostly, how are they maintained?

Richard Holle
2008-May-09, 08:55 PM
http://www.redorbit.com/news/space/1375448/wave_pattern_discovered_in_saturns_atmosphere/index.html

Saturn's seasonal weather article....

m1omg
2008-May-11, 08:50 AM
http://www.redorbit.com/news/space/1375448/wave_pattern_discovered_in_saturns_atmosphere/index.html

Saturn's seasonal weather article....

Thread necromancy, again.

Are you aware that this topic was dead for over 5 years?

Neverfly
2008-May-11, 08:59 AM
So what?
Threads are not started to make them die.

The article was intersting, Thank you Richard Holle.

Richard Holle
2008-May-11, 03:22 PM
probably far more accurate than what we can do for Earth on Earth!

Sorry new here (reference the 5 year dead thread) yes a noob i am...

I have a thread over in ATM on planetary and lunar effects on Earth's weather complete with forecast for all of 2008 (user name and pass word for use on the web site provided)

01101001
2008-May-11, 04:28 PM
Sorry new here (reference the 5 year dead thread) yes a noob i am...

Not a big deal. It's OK to revive old threads if the new article fits and the previous articles provide welcome context.

It's kind to prominently announce in your article that it is a revival, just to remind people that much of the material they might see is old.

It can cause some confusion, even if you provide a heads-up, so weigh the choices, but it doesn't make a lot of difference.

And, welcome to BAUT Forum.

cran
2008-May-14, 06:42 PM
My BBC "Planets" DVD says the atmosphere on the warmer planets is more turbulent and this slows the winds down. On the colder planets they just keep going round.From memory, the discussion was along the lines of:

Jupiter and Saturn generate more heat than they receive from the Sun, and this heat leads to turbulence which tends to slow the winds down ...
the reason why wind velocities were higher on Uranus and Neptune was put down to less turbulence and no discernable topography - ie, nothing to slow them down ...

I don't recall if any reason was given for why the winds started or achieved such velocities in the first place ... but perhaps they resulted from planetary formation (accretion, compaction > reduced radius + increased rotational velocity), with further impetus via gravitational tugs from satellites ...?

dodecahedron
2008-May-14, 08:54 PM
Sad isn't it :(
I wish there was at least a Jovian weather report once a month.


The atmospherre will be mostly unbreathable with a thirty percent chance of lightning. Still no relief in sight for the jovians living around Hurricane Red, relief efforts from the rest of the solar system appear to be stalled or nonexistent. If you're travelling amidst the lighter colored bands expect downpours of methane and ammonia so make your kids put on their galoshes, Moms!

cjl
2008-May-15, 06:30 PM
Only a thirty percent chance of lightning and mostly unbreathable?

Sounds like a nice day - I think I'll take a walk outside at lunch ;)

mugaliens
2008-May-16, 02:01 PM
Wind velocity has much to do with air density. The less dense the air, the greater the volocity, in general.

However, closer to the sun, the solar energy takes a more overriding role.

If you ever get a chance to see The Chronicles of Riddick, staring Vin Diesel, do so. There's an amazing scene involving what might happen along the terminator of a planet with an Earth-like atmosphere that is nevertheless in an orbit such as Mercury or at a more Earth-like orbit but around a far hotter star than is the Sun.

I found it fascinating!

cran
2008-May-16, 09:29 PM
Wind velocity has much to do with air density. The less dense the air, the greater the volocity, in general.
hmm ... interesting thought - but wouldn't that mean that the giant planets should have slower wind velocities than the terrestrial planets? And that Mars, Mercury, and some of the satellites, should have the highest?

[off-topic]


If you ever get a chance to see The Chronicles of Riddick, staring Vin Diesel, do so. There's an amazing scene involving what might happen along the terminator of a planet with an Earth-like atmosphere that is nevertheless in an orbit such as Mercury or at a more Earth-like orbit but around a far hotter star than is the Sun.

I found it fascinating!
Fun to watch, perhaps ... but I can't see a planet like that keeping an Earth-like atmosphere for very long ... Venusian, yes; Earth, no ...

Where did all the oxygen come from? (you know, the stuff that was merrily lighting up the horizon and that presumably everybody was breathing?)

And did you see any signs of water? [/off topic]