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Fraser
2004-Jan-07, 10:03 PM
SUMMARY: New calculations by a pair of Harvard astronomers predict that the first "Sun-like" stars in the Universe were alone; devoid of planets or life. The very first generation of stars was hot and massive; they lived hard and died young. After they exploded as supernovae and seeded the Universe with heavier materials, other stars formed in stellar nurseries. The next generation of stars was probably similar in mass and composition to our own Sun, but there weren't enough minerals to create rocky planets like the Earth. It took a succession of supernovae before there was enough heavy material that planets could form - probably 500 million to 2 billion years after the Big Bang.

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om@umr.edu
2004-Jan-07, 11:38 PM
Originally posted by fraser@Jan 7 2004, 10:03 PM
SUMMARY: New calculations by a pair of Harvard astronomers predict that the first "Sun-like" stars in the Universe were alone; devoid of planets or life. The very first generation of stars was hot and massive; they lived hard and died young. After they exploded as supernovae and seeded the Universe with heavier materials, other stars formed in stellar nurseries. The next generation of stars was probably similar in mass and composition to our own Sun, but there weren't enough minerals to create rocky planets like the Earth. It took a succession of supernovae before there was enough heavy material that planets could form - probably 500 million to 2 billion years after the Big Bang.

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.
Dear Fraser :D :

This "news" is, in my opinion, almost void and highly spectulative <_< .

Little that might not have been concluded from reading the B2FH paper in 1957 <_< .

B2FH also thought 1st generation stars were big balls of hydrogen <_<.

They even thought the Sun was made mostly of hydrogen, like its surface <_<.

But measurements showed the Sun is NOT A BALL OF HYDROGEN :angry:

http://www.umr.edu/~om/abstracts2002/soho-gong2002.pdf
http://www.umr.edu/~om/abstracts2002/soho-gong2002.ps

Rocky, Earth-like planets were found orbiting a pulsar&#33;&#33; :blink: [Science 264: 539-542 (1994)].

Why ignore these findings and report as "news" an evolutionary sequence of events that we might believed in 1957 :blink:?

With kind regards,

Oliver :D
om@umr.edu
http://www.umr.edu/~om/
http://www.ballofiron.com/
http://www.chem.umr.edu/web/facres/manuel.html

coover
2004-Jan-07, 11:54 PM
If the Suns were formed and emitting light, but there was nobody there to see them, did they actually shine?

VanderL
2004-Jan-08, 11:27 AM
Sure, they have done for ages before us and will do long after we&#39;re gone.