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RMallon
2001-Nov-29, 10:37 PM
...from Space.com e-subscription:

"THE MOON & SATURN: Sky watchers across much of North America can see the Full Moon glide in front of the planet Saturn after sunset on Friday, Nov. 30th. Europeans will see the same thing during the early morning hours of Dec. 1st. It's the second close encounter between the Moon and Saturn this month. Pictured above is the first -- captured on film by Antoine Gerhardt & Lionel Bernardi near Nice, France, Nov. 3, 2001. [photo gallery] [Saturn finder] [event times: USA, Europe] [more from Sky & Telescope]"

http://www.spaceweather.com/

Peter B
2001-Nov-29, 11:40 PM
Do Southern hemisphere people miss out on this? A parallax thing?

RMallon
2001-Nov-30, 12:08 AM
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap010908.html

Hmmm, not sure Peter, better let us know tomorrow night - your time, when you're looking up to check. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_rolleyes.gif
Randy



http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0109/ocsat_anim.gif



<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: RMallon on 2001-11-29 19:13 ]</font>

David Hall
2001-Nov-30, 04:17 AM
Hey, what about us Asians?

Almost all the information I have access to in English is focused on North America. Does anyone know of a site with monthly highlights visible to people in other areas of the globe?

GrapesOfWrath
2001-Nov-30, 11:33 AM
Somebody has to do it.

It's a lot of work. I tried to do one for our town--I could borrow a great deal from the usual sites, but things like occulatations and Iridium flares and space station flyovers are location specific.

ToSeek
2001-Nov-30, 01:03 PM
On 2001-11-29 18:40, Peter B wrote:
Do Southern hemisphere people miss out on this? A parallax thing?


Yes - the occulation is only seen over a limited area (like a solar eclipse). See the diagram on this page:
http://www.astronomy.com/message/message_large.asp?idDailyMessageGUID={A5D9EA7D-2E48-47AE-8A24-DE964B9F30A4}

RMallon
2001-Nov-30, 11:38 PM
Just got to see Saturn disappear behind the Moon! All I had available to me at the occult time just now was a pair of 30x binocs. Saw perhaps 15 minutes of the event. Could barely make out Saturn's oblong shape.
Beautiful.

Randy
Austin, Tx

Russ
2001-Dec-05, 03:23 AM
On 2001-11-30 18:38, RMallon wrote:
Just got to see Saturn disappear behind the Moon! All I had available to me at the occult time just now was a pair of 30x binocs. Saw perhaps 15 minutes of the event. Could barely make out Saturn's oblong shape.
Beautiful.


GREEN, GREEN, ENVY, ENVY. Fie upon you folk of the clear sky. Here in Cincinnati it was crystal clear all day. Come night time and time for the occultation, A THIN LAYER OF OBSCURING CLOUDS! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif I'm going to write my senators & congressmen and declare my victumhood status! I'll get thousands of $$ for stress and suffering! I'll rant and cry and get on Sally Jessy. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif

Or I'll just try again 12-29 when it happens again. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

On another note; somebody asked if it could be seen from the southern hemisphere. I don't think so. The December issue of Sky & Telescope had maps and as I recall, northern Mexico was as far south as it could be ssen.

Zandermann
2001-Dec-05, 03:42 AM
GREEN, GREEN, ENVY, ENVY. Fie upon you folk of the clear sky. Here in Cincinnati it was crystal clear all day. Come night time and time for the occultation, A THIN LAYER OF OBSCURING CLOUDS!And aren't you glad you've moved to the wonderful Ohio River valley?

Nice part of the country, but bad seeing *way* too often!

The Rat
2001-Dec-05, 02:28 PM
On 2001-12-04 22:23, Russ wrote:
GREEN, GREEN, ENVY, ENVY. Fie upon you folk of the clear sky. Here in Cincinnati it was crystal clear all day. Come night time and time for the occultation, A THIN LAYER OF OBSCURING CLOUDS! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif

Try Toronto for hard luck, we're batting .000 lately. The Saturn occultation was totally rained out, as was the event a few days earlier when Mars and Uranus just about smacked into each other. And the Leonids? FOG.

ToSeek
2001-Dec-05, 03:31 PM
On 2001-12-04 22:23, Russ wrote:

Or I'll just try again 12-29 when it happens again. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif



Yeah, at about 4 am. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif

Russ
2001-Dec-05, 10:18 PM
On 2001-12-04 22:42, Zandermann wrote:
And aren't you glad you've moved to the wonderful Ohio River valley?

Nice part of the country, but bad seeing *way* too often!


Hey Z!

You must have been blocked out too. In past years I've done pretty good, except for nearly freezing to death watching a January lunar eclipse. This year, however, has been a real B***h (rhymes with hitch).

To the others of you who were polite enough to respond to my whine, I commiserate with you and your weather.

Clear skys to all.

R

GrapesOfWrath
2002-Feb-18, 08:00 PM
Time to bump up this old thread.

The moon occults Saturn this Wednesday night. It'll be a nice show for most everybody on the East Coast of the USA, just over an hour past sunset, high in the sky, and the leading edge of the moon is dark.

amstrad
2002-Feb-18, 08:46 PM
Sky & Telescope (http://www.skypub.com) has the usual important <a href="http://skyandtelescope.com/observing/objects/occultations/article_297_1.asp">info<a/>

It will begin during daylight or dusk for most of the US, but end after dark. Remember, times on the map are in UT.

here in houston I am also blessed with a bright pass (http://www.heavens-above.com/PassDetails.asp?SatID=25544&lat=29.763&lng=-95.363&alt=0&loc=Houston&TZ=CST&Date=37308.0384754249) of ISS very close to the Moon/Jupiter. So I just need the cloud gods to stay away...

Roy Batty
2002-Feb-18, 09:07 PM
Good luck! whats the magnitude (ISS)? I see its almost 90o altitude at max. I never seem to get very good viewing.. either its to low on horizon or clouds /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif

amstrad
2002-Feb-18, 10:42 PM
oh, right, i'm suprised that page doesn't display magnitude. It'll be -0.7 (Saturn is 0.0 and jupiter is -2.3 right now)

The Bad Astronomer
2002-Feb-19, 03:38 PM
The American Astronomical Society forwarded to me this press release:


MOON TO COVER SATURN ON FEBRUARY 20TH

Note to Editors/Producers: This release is accompanied by three
publication-quality graphics; see details below, or go straight to the
online version of this release at

http://SkyandTelescope.com/aboutsky/pressreleases/article_495_1.asp

The Moon sweeps across the planet Saturn on Wednesday, February 20th, for
skygazers in North America. The rendezvous occurs in early-evening darkness
in the northeastern part of the continent, where it will be visible with or
without optical aid (weather permitting). Farther south and west Saturn and
the Moon meet in twilight or daylight; in these parts observers should be
able to catch the action in small telescopes.

Astronomers call this type of event, when one celestial object blocks
another from view, an occultation. Wednesday's occultation happens when the
Moon, in orbit around the Earth, crosses the same part of the sky as
Saturn, which orbits the Sun. Their meeting is, of course, an illusion. The
Moon lies some 388,000 kilometers (241,000 miles) from Earth, while Saturn,
1.3 billion kilometers (830 million miles) away on February 20th, is
thousands of times more distant.

The Moon is a bit past first quarter, 55 percent illuminated, when it
overtakes the ringed planet. By then the two will have already set in
Europe on the morning of the 21st, except for portions of Portugal, Spain,
and northwest Africa. But for the eastern United States and the northern
Caribbean, Saturn disappears behind the Moon's dark limb (edge) when well
up in the south after sunset. It reappears on the bright limb roughly 60 to
75 minutes later. SKY & TELESCOPE has prepared a table listing when Saturn
disappears and reappears as seen from 300 North American cities:

http://SkyandTelescope.com/observing/objects/occultations/article_496_1.asp

The Moon takes roughly two minutes to swallow Saturn from ring tip to ring
tip. The event's leisurely pace, combined with the rings' tilt nearly wide
open as seen from Earth, means telescopic observers have a rare opportunity
to see or photograph the planet's faint C (inner) and F (outer) rings.
Titan, the Saturn's largest moon, trails the planet's disappearance by 6 to
8 minutes, depending on your location. Because of its size, Titan should
make a gradual, 2-second-long entry behind the lunar limb.

Lunar occultations of bright planets are satisfying visual treats no matter
what equipment you use to observe them. Wednesday's event occurs with the
Moon and Saturn nestled between the Hyades and Pleiades star clusters in
the constellation Taurus, the Bull, providing an attractive setting for
naked-eye or binocular viewing. To see a map of this heavenly get-together,
use SKY & TELESCOPE's new interactive sky chart, which can be customized
for any location and any date and time:

http://SkyandTelescope.com/observing/skychart/

The Moon will occult Saturn several more times this year, but these
cover-ups will be invisible or unfavorable for North Americans. The next
series of Saturn occultations does not begin until late 2006, so take in
Wednesday's event if you have the good fortune of clear skies that evening.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

SKY & TELESCOPE is pleased to make several publication-quality graphics
available to help the news media explain this week's lunar occultation of
Saturn to the public. Permission is granted for one-time, nonexclusive use
in print and broadcast media, as long as appropriate credit is given to SKY
& TELESCOPE and, for the photo, to Etienne Bonduelle. Captions are provided
here.

Map of occultation visibilty across North America:

The lunar occultation of Saturn on February 20th favors the East Coast of
North America, where it occurs in darkness. Observers farther west will be
hampered by twilight or daylight but should still be able to see the planet
telescopically near the time of its disappearance. Purple curves give the
Universal Times of Saturn's disappearance, red curves its reappearance. SKY
& TELESCOPE diagram.

Diagram showing path of Saturn behind the Moon as seen from various cities:

Skywatchers in many North American cities are poised to see the Moon occult
Saturn on February 20th, when the planet takes various paths behind the
lunar disk. Celestial north is up. SKY & TELESCOPE diagram.

Photo of Saturn emerging from a lunar occultation last November 3rd:

Observing from Cambrai in northern France, Etienne Bonduelle watched as
Saturn reappeared from behind the waning gibbous Moon on November 3, 2001.
He made this composite image using a Meade 8-inch LX90 Schmidt-Cassegrain
telescope and a Philips ToUcam Pro webcam.

amstrad
2002-Feb-20, 09:49 PM
ah yes, the cloud gods love me...

and wow, Saturn is amazing even in broad daylight (of course its harder to find unless you have a huge locator like the Moon)

Donnie B.
2002-Feb-20, 11:06 PM
Darn!

Heavy overcast; moon is just barely visible. Nothing dimmer than the moon shows anywhere.

*sigh*

Zandermann
2002-Feb-20, 11:51 PM
...and we here in Southern Ohio are shut out again too...

...blasted clouds! I should have set up that big electric fan earlier today!

GrapesOfWrath
2002-Feb-21, 10:05 AM
I should know better than to post this. Clouds every time!

Thumper
2002-Feb-21, 11:06 AM
Southern Ohio, Central Ohio.....

It looked like the whole midwest was socked in. A month ago when I first read about this event, (in my typical glass half empty fashion), I correctly predicted rain and clouds for the evening of the 20th.

Did anybody get get any good views?
Know where we can look at some good pictures at least?

Oh well, we've had some real nice ISS passes in the last couple of weeks. I've even been able to turn some friends onto it. It was so big and bright the other night that my 21 month daughter was able to point up to it and say "Space Station!" (or at least something close)

amstrad
2002-Feb-21, 12:48 PM
Randy Brewer (http://www.randybrewer.net/), a member of the Houston Astronomical Society (http://spacsun.rice.edu/~has/), got these (http://www.randybrewer.net/images/FCT150-Images/MoonSaturnOcultation.jpg) pictures of Saturn reappearing.

Don Pearce, another member, timed the four events (from Lat. 29 41 50 N and Lon. 95 28 48 W) at: (1) 5:26:05 (2) 5:27:30 (3) 6:57:15 (4) 6:58:55, all CST

SeanF
2002-Feb-21, 01:17 PM
Here in Sioux Falls, SD, we had clear skies for it, so it wasn't the whole midwest.

It was completely overcast in the morning, and the weather.com website didn't give me much hope, but by the time I left work it had cleared up and we had a clear view; plus the event occurred almost directly overhead, so atmospheric distortion was minimized . . .

Unfortunately, I don't have a camera to attach to my 'scope, so I've got no pictures, but it was sure neat to watch!

Russ
2002-Feb-21, 08:04 PM
I can personnally vouch for Zanderman except he candy coated the situation. Not just clouds but rain and high winds. We didn't have a prayer. Fie upon you Red Baron!

Donnie B.
2002-Feb-21, 11:44 PM
And tonight, like every other night this week EXCEPT yesterday, it's clear as a bell. Bah!

Thumper
2002-Feb-22, 01:31 PM
Today's "Astronomy Picture of the Day" had this sequence of the occultation. Apparently it was clear that night in Kansas.

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap020222.html