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Tiny
2004-Jan-20, 08:37 PM
What is the strongest magnetic field ever known? I only know Solar wind is 0.00005 Gauss and the Earth's field at ground level 1 Gauss...what is the others?

Guest_jtommasi
2004-Jan-21, 02:43 PM
The strongest manmade magnetic field I can recall is a magnetic field confined within a small chamber that was able to levitate a frog. I'm sure the magnetic field around some astronomical bodies may be greater

GOURDHEAD
2004-Jan-21, 04:08 PM
:unsure: :unsure: My guess is that magnetars or black holes harbor the largest "known" magnetic fields.

A more mind bending question might be "What is the limit of magnetic field intensity?" How many field "lines" (largest flux) can a specified volume of spacetime tolerate? Also, what is the maximum charge density? What effect, if any, do these maxima have on black hole structure? :unsure: :unsure:

Tiny
2004-Jan-21, 06:09 PM
Originally posted by GOURDHEAD@Jan 21 2004, 04:08 PM
:unsure: :unsure: My guess is that magnetars or black holes harbor the largest "known" magnetic fields.

A more mind bending question might be "What is the limit of magnetic field intensity?" How many field "lines" (largest flux) can a specified volume of spacetime tolerate? Also, what is the maximum charge density? What effect, if any, do these maxima have on black hole structure? :unsure: :unsure:
I guess ur are right, Black Hole and Magnetars has the most strongest magnetic field, like 10 trillion Gauss...

damienpaul
2004-Jan-21, 06:38 PM
Here is an article about Magnetars and their magnetism, apparantly around 200 times stronger than the suns!

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/...40108080312.htm (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040108080312.htm)

here is another interesting one about earth's magnetic field weakening

http://www.chron.com/cs/CDA/ssistory.mpl/space/2332981

Prime
2004-Jan-21, 09:55 PM
This is the strongest in our Galaxy;

http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/ap000122.html

Prime

Guest_Faulkner
2004-Jan-23, 03:18 PM
The strongest manmade magnetic field I can recall is a magnetic field confined within a small chamber that was able to levitate a frog.

How can you possibly levitate a frog???

damienpaul
2004-Jan-23, 03:28 PM
well they have found magnetic fields in just about everything - even things like paper, plastic, faulkners, chooks, josh's, kashi's, fraser's and frogs

Guest_Faulkner
2004-Jan-23, 11:31 PM
Sheesh, I thought you could only levitate metallic objects...like ball-bearings etc...!?

So if you're correct, then how come we can't make "artificial gravity" aboard spaceships? Just exert a magnetic force down upon the astronauts!? For that matter, how come we can't build vehicles that magnetically levitate themselves to orbit?

I'm reminded of a scene from "Earth Vs The Flying Saucers":-

"We generate a magnetic field stronger than the gravitational field on your Earth. That is the principle by which we move through space!"

Wisdom from back in 1956?? Hmm...

BACK TO TOPIC: Much matter in this Universe seems to generate magnetic fields. I wonder if the Universe as a whole generates one colossal magnetic field? In which case, where do the flux lines exist? In nothingness?

damienpaul
2004-Jan-24, 12:59 AM
I will try and find the article, but i do remember reading it....yes i was thinking about where the flux lines would be if the universe were a collosal magnetic field.

Matthew
2004-Jan-24, 05:57 AM
A magnetar has a magnetic field 100 times stronger than a typical neutron star. And a typical neutron star can have a magnetic field one trillion times stonger than the magnetic field of Earth.

Guest_Faulkner
2004-Jan-26, 12:47 AM
I'm still sceptical about this frog-levitation business.

Tiny
2004-Jan-26, 01:11 AM
This is what I found on the internet...

The strongest, naturally-occurring, fields are found on a new kind of neutron star called a magnetar. These fields can exceed 1000 trillion Gauss. For man-made fields that have been sustained under laboratory conditions, the number is about 400,000 Gauss. Fields over 1 million Gauss have been created momentarily by explosive compression.

Galactic magnetic field 0.00001 Gauss
Solar Wind 0.00005 Gauss
Interstellar molecular cloud 0.001 Gauss
Earth's field at ground level 1 Gauss
Solar surface field 1-5 Gauss
Massive star typical field (pre supernova) 100 Gauss
Toy refrigerator magnet 100 Gauss
Sun spot field 1000 Gauss
Jupiter magnetic field 1000 Gauss
Magnetic Stars such as BD+54 2846 11,500 Gauss
White Dwarf star surfaces 1,000,000 Gauss
Neutron star surface field 1,000,000,000,000 Gauss
Magnetar field 1,000,000,000,000,000 Gauss

Guest_Faulkner
2004-Jan-26, 12:17 PM
I'm still on this levitating frog bizzo... Yes, I can see now it must be possible. The Earth's magnetic field deflects particles pouring from the Sun. Particle accelerators use electromagnets to propel their protons etc in a straight line. So yes, magnetic fields obviously do affect matter (not just metallic things like ball bearings, iron filings, etc).

This is quite a new idea for me. Can't we (as I've asked before) use magnetic fields to simulate a "gravitational" field aboard a spaceship?? What's preventing us from doing this? Does a strong magnetic field have a damaging affect on human physiology at all??

GOURDHEAD
2004-Jan-26, 01:56 PM
Tiny:

Thanks for the table of magnetic fluxes.

Guest_Faulkner:

It's very difficult to determine how one can make a magnetic field function sufficiently like a gravitationl field to make the substitution work. Polarization is an inescapable property of magnetic fields; whereas, gravitational field polarization is not known to be observable. Gravitation is more easily simulated with a centrifuge in space.

Matthew
2004-Jan-27, 02:14 AM
And to if you had a strong magnetic field around the spacecraft it would need to be balanced so metallic objects would'nt fly around the craft. And keeping it blanced would would require quite complex computational power and of course it would use up a lot more energy.