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Fraser
2004-Jan-25, 04:58 PM
SUMMARY: NASA's Opportunity rover successfully landed on the surface of Mars early Sunday morning, giving the agency two successful landings this month. The spacecraft landed in a region of Mars called Meridiani Planum which is on the opposite side of the planet from Gusev Crater. Initial estimates placed the rover about 24 km down range from the centre of the target area, but well within the regions of hematite which could be an indication of past water. Unlike Spirit, Opportunity landed on its side and righted itself when it opened the petals of its lander. Opportunity's airbags aren't blocking the exit ramp, so there won't be a problem when the rover rolls out onto the Martian surface.

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jimmy
2004-Jan-25, 05:17 PM
One successful landing was incredible, two within a month is mind blowing,.... :) considering the difficulty of Martian landings. I'm happy! :)

damienpaul
2004-Jan-26, 01:28 AM
Maybe this will once and for all break the martian 'curse'...how many more landers are there going to be?

gangariver
2004-Jan-26, 05:54 PM
Science from Mars
According to the NYTimes article in 25 Jan 04 issue,Ē With each new image from Opportunity beamed back to Earth came more oohs and aahs" with the Principal Scientist saying "I will attempt no science analysis, because it looks like nothing Iíve ever seen before. Iíve got no words for this."
Am I missing something here? We have about two- dozen meteorite samples from Mars in our laboratories, ranging in crystallization ages from 165 to 4500 million years. Mineralogy, chemical abundances, isotopic composition of chemical elements and even amino acids in these samples has been studied extensively during the past twenty-five years. What more can this "science mission" achieve that we do not know?
This reminds me of the excitement generated in River City, Iowa, by Meredith Wilson's famous character, Professor Harold Hill in the delightful musical, The Music Man.

om@umr.edu
2004-Jan-26, 06:50 PM
Originally posted by gangariver@Jan 26 2004, 05:54 PM
Science from Mars
According to the NYTimes article in 25 Jan 04 issue,Ē With each new image from Opportunity beamed back to Earth came more oohs and aahs" with the Principal Scientist saying "I will attempt no science analysis, because it looks like nothing Iíve ever seen before. Iíve got no words for this."
Am I missing something here? We have about two- dozen meteorite samples from Mars in our laboratories, ranging in crystallization ages from 165 to 4500 million years. Mineralogy, chemical abundances, isotopic composition of chemical elements and even amino acids in these samples has been studied extensively during the past twenty-five years. What more can this "science mission" achieve that we do not know?
This reminds me of the excitement generated in River City, Iowa, by Meredith Wilson's famous character, Professor Harold Hill in the delightful musical, The Music Man.
Yes, you are missing something here! :blink:

The garnering of votes for the next election. <_<

Look at the press these pictures receive&#33; <_<

Science may not benefit, but PR for someone&#39;s re-election surely will&#33; :blink:

With kind regards,

Oliver :D

Bluewolf027
2004-Jan-26, 07:22 PM
Originally posted by gangariver@Jan 26 2004, 05:54 PM
Am I missing something here? We have about two- dozen meteorite samples from Mars in our laboratories, ranging in crystallization ages from 165 to 4500 million years. Mineralogy, chemical abundances, isotopic composition of chemical elements and even amino acids in these samples has been studied extensively during the past twenty-five years. What more can this "science mission" achieve that we do not know?

Yes you definetely are missing something if you think the elements/make-up history, etc of an entire planet can be gathered from 2 dozen meteorites.

The main purpose of the missions is to look for evidence that mars once had water on its surface as many of its features suggest. And for exploration in general the info and even the pictures that these rovers are gathering will give us a foundation to exploring mars in the future and manned exploration in the future. I hardly think that your two dozen meteorites will provide us with the knowledge to explore the planet someday.