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samoth
2004-Feb-06, 02:45 AM
I am curious what kind of careers/jobs exist for someone who graduates with a degree in physics/astronomy.

Specifically: I have applied for transfer into another universities' astrophysics program from my current school where I am majoring in biochemistry (my present university offers very little in astronomy/astrophysics). My question is, what fields exist out there in the non-college (ie. real) world that might be available for someone who graduates in this area?

Further, does a significant difference in occupational options exist between possessing a bachelor's versus a master's degree... or either degree versus a PhD?

Just curious... I am not looking for any in-depth answers necessarily... just a broad idea -- especially from any persons who are in this field of work themselves!

Tiny
2004-Feb-06, 04:49 AM
I know some college they are hiring ppls that actually interseting in Astronomy/physic, I mean they can work with other prof. even they are graduate... >< but the incoming...only &#036;7.50 per hour

1. Try to join a club (Astronomy club)
2. Maybe those ppls in that club can find you a job

samoth
2004-Feb-06, 09:04 PM
Thanks, but I&#39;m not looking for a job per se... just wondering what&#39;s out there&#33;
Currently, there are no clubs of this sort at my school... hence my transferring. Heck, I&#39;d be ecstatic if there was an astronomy club here.

jce1975
2004-Feb-06, 09:06 PM
I am not sure about things you can do while in school. Perhaps you could help out at a local observatory? The one thing I read though was that you have to have a PhD in order to become a professional astronomer.

jce1975
2004-Feb-06, 09:16 PM
Check out this site ...

http://www.aas.org/education/career.html

James

jce1975
2004-Feb-06, 09:21 PM
This site too ...

http://www.phys-astro.sonoma.edu/people/fa.../tenn/Jobs.html (http://www.phys-astro.sonoma.edu/people/faculty/tenn/Jobs.html)

Hope this helps&#33;


James

Dave Reneke
2004-Feb-07, 08:53 AM
I&#39;m currently assisting people here in Australia on career paths and hope these sites will also be of use to you.

Remember that it&#39;s not a high paying career selection and positions are very competitively advertised.. it depends on the country you&#39;re in. Here in Australia we find most graduates, my students also, need to look overseas.

Careers in Astronomy: A brouchure by the American Astronomical Society.

Frequently Asked Questions about Being an Astronomer: from the National Optical

Astronomy Observatories.
103 FAQs about Career in Astronomy: from Sten Odenwald&#39;s Astronomy Cafe.

Regards DAVE RENEKE
SKY & SPACE Magazine Contributing Editor
info@skyandspace.com.au

TheAstronomer
2004-Feb-07, 12:51 PM
Howdy,

Well, a degree would probably assist you a long way in finding a career in "grunt" research, but like every specialzed avenue, it&#39;s an extremely competitive field.

I will tell you that if you aren&#39;t interested in getting paid, it is entirely possible to have a very satisfactory and very busy volunteer status. For example, a certain wide-eyed amateur astronomer of my acquaintance took physics and astronomy courses whenever this person could afford them - not so much toward a degree as much as toward understanding what she was looking at. Spent a great many years doing studies with various telescopes and writing about them - and went on to stick a foot in the door of any place she could get into.

Next thing ya&#39; know? Invitations to study with people that honestly do have degrees and careers in astronomy and volunteering at local observatories. A "Hey&#33; You&#39;re good&#33;" and then you&#39;re off into the volunteer land of Public Outreach. Before ya&#39; know it, you&#39;re webmaster for their sites, hosting evenings at the Observatory and traveling to schools on your days off to give fun and informative classes.

And still workin&#39; a day job. ;)

All I can tell you is to reach for the stars, dude&#33; The only people who never fail are the one who never try...

Rockin&#39; the Night,

~T

Guest_degeneration
2004-Feb-07, 06:12 PM
I&#39;ve read/heard before that some accounting firms hire astronomers who are not looking for jobs in astronomy because most astronomers are used to dealing with very large numbers, so find it easier to get their head around accounts&#33;&#33;

Guest
2004-Feb-08, 04:16 AM
Thank you all for your input&#33;

While money is not a priority in my life, I would like a career that would be capable to support myself (and family, if/when). Volunteer work is really out of the question (after school, that is).

I know what I want from school... now it&#39;s just a matter of how much graduate work I wish to do, and what kinds of jobs to consider. The links and information here are much appreciated&#33;

samoth
2004-Feb-08, 04:18 AM
Originally posted by Guest@Feb 8 2004, 04:16 AM
Thank you all for your input&#33;

While money is not a priority in my life, I would like a career that would be capable to support myself (and family, if/when). Volunteer work is really out of the question (after school, that is).

I know what I want from school... now it&#39;s just a matter of how much graduate work I wish to do, and what kinds of jobs to consider. The links and information here are much appreciated&#33;
Oops... forgot to log in...

Dave Mitsky
2004-Feb-08, 09:03 AM
Another article worth reading can be found at http://www.astronomy.com/content/dynamic/a...00/459kwivk.asp (http://www.astronomy.com/content/dynamic/articles/000/000/000/459kwivk.asp)

Dave Mitsky

Guest
2004-Feb-11, 02:37 PM
I am a student of Commerce but i m interestd in astronomy & thats why we established a SPACE CLUB.Plz tell me that how i can make a career in this field.
regards,
Ratnesh

Guest
2004-Feb-11, 02:40 PM
ratnesh.
from "ratnesh_pandit@yahoo.co.in"
regards,
ratnesh

Dan Luna
2004-Feb-11, 06:46 PM
A Physics degree is good evidence you can think logically and handle maths. I got a job in I.T. with mine.

damienpaul
2004-Feb-11, 10:47 PM
I have a geology degree and became a teacher of physics with that

samoth
2004-Apr-13, 10:29 PM
Just wanted to bump this to get some new or different opinions&#33;

Thanks&#33;


"Apr 13, 2004 - Do you have questions about space and astronomy that keep you up at night? I&#39;ve convinced a group of experienced astronomers and space engineers to volunteer to answer your questions - no matter how insane they might sound."