PDA

View Full Version : Don't forget to watch the shuttle launch



nebularain
2002-Oct-06, 12:32 AM
In case you haven't heard, the shuttle launch (which was delayed due to the hurrican) is scheduled for Monday, according to this report (http://dsc.discovery.com/news/afp/20020930/shuttle1.html) . Anyway, there's a camara attached to the outside of the shuttle that will be filming the take-off into space.

Here's the link to NASA t.v. to see the launch: http://www.nasa.gov/ntv/ntvweb.html

Here's a better site, which also gives the mission clock (count-down 'til launch): http://www.space.com/shuttlemissions/

Enjoy!
_________________
"But I can see the Covenant colors [that] the sun and the rain have woven against the blue of the sky"
- Rich Mullins, The Howling

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: nebularain on 2002-10-05 20:36 ]</font>

ToSeek
2002-Oct-07, 03:34 PM
I'm going to bump this back up to the top - launch is at 3:46 pm EDT today, complete with the first live camera actually on the outside of the shuttle (actually the external tank) to view the launch as it happens.

David Hall
2002-Oct-07, 04:47 PM
For a broadband stream, try here:
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/nasatv/
(in-browser player)

Or go here for direct player links. Scroll down to the bottom:
http://www.idb.com.au/dcottle/pages/nasatv.html

Just 3 hours to go. Can I stay up that late?

Johnno
2002-Oct-07, 05:59 PM
http://www.broadcast.com/learning_and_education/science/space/nasa/nasa_television/


300k feed there, I usually watch that one since I have a good connection.

Argos
2002-Oct-07, 06:21 PM
Very, very cool link. Here we are, 1.5 hours to take-off. Fantastic.

David Hall
2002-Oct-07, 06:25 PM
I've got the feed going now. They've just announced it's about 30 minutes to launch. The countdown on the page nebularain gave seems to be off by an hour.

Get on the feed now if you can! /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

edit: D'oh! Well, now they've just said 1:30 to go. I'm confused now. They must have a delay scheduled in there somewhere.
_________________
<font size="-1">PLEASE NOTE: Some quantum physics theories suggest that when the consumer is not directly observing this product, it may cease to exist or will exist only in a vague and undetermined state.</font>

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: David Hall on 2002-10-07 14:26 ]</font>

CJSF
2002-Oct-07, 06:26 PM
There are some built-in holds for every launch. The countdown might be at T minus 30 minutes, but the launch time is still set for 2:46 PM Central Time (currently that's 5 hours behind GMT).

CJSF

_________________
"Be very, very careful what you put into that head, because you will never,
ever get it out."
-Thomas Cardinal Wolsey (1471-1530)

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Christopher Ferro on 2002-10-07 14:27 ]</font>

David Hall
2002-Oct-07, 06:28 PM
Yeah, I just caught that. I shoulda thought about it a bit. It figures they'd give the proper time just after I decided to post. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif

Timm
2002-Oct-07, 07:36 PM
All the servers are completely flooded, I can only get an audio stream... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif

I hope they're recording this, so I can download it later...

Johnno
2002-Oct-07, 07:39 PM
It's always like this before a launch, I usually have 4-5 media player feeds open just to have one that works during launch. I never close them down because I tried to watch one launch and then the feeds were filled up and I couldnt open up a new window...

GrapesOfWrath
2002-Oct-07, 08:03 PM
On 2002-10-07 15:39, Johnno wrote:
It's always like this before a launch, I usually have 4-5 media player feeds open just to have one that works during launch.
Houston, we have a problem. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_smile.gif

Donnie B.
2002-Oct-07, 08:07 PM
OK, saw it on CNN. Looked fantastic until SRB sep, then apparently the separation motors' exhaust left the lens coated with gunk. After that, it looked like what I see after entering a warm house on a cold day (with my glasses on).

NASA could have done a bit better... they were switched away from the onboard cam for SRB sep, so you couldn't see that from the "tank's eye view".

nebularain
2002-Oct-07, 08:10 PM
Got to see the launch on t.v., too. (No! No! No! Go back to the shuttle-cam!!!!)

Bummer about the camera lens smudging up. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_frown.gif

ToSeek
2002-Oct-07, 08:53 PM
They showed two replays of the "shuttle-cam" (as received by two different tracking stations, I think), and neither had a particularly good view of SRB separation. It looked to me as if the Sun came into view and washed out the picture, then the lens got gunked up by the SRB debris to all but finish things off.

Also, it looked to me as if the roll maneuver shortly after liftoff overshot and had to be undone by 10 or 20 degrees. I don't remember noticing that happen before, but maybe I just wasn't paying close attention.

Jigsaw
2002-Oct-07, 09:49 PM
I'm lost--is there a link to see the liftoff footage from the ShuttleCam?

Lisa
2002-Oct-07, 09:55 PM
That was too cool. Okay, so the lens smudged up a bit. That's the first time they've ever done this. Really neat looking at the Florida coastline.
And I almost missed it! Forgot all about it. (I was reminded. Thanks)

Doodler
2002-Oct-08, 02:16 PM
Anybody have a link for those of us that missed the launch but want to catch replays?

ToSeek
2002-Oct-08, 02:37 PM
On 2002-10-08 10:16, Doodler wrote:
Anybody have a link for those of us that missed the launch but want to catch replays?



The Washington Post has a RealPlayer replay (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/mmedia/nation/100702-7v.htm).

CNN and Spaceflight Now also have videos, but you'd have to pay for the privilege.

Jim
2002-Oct-08, 03:27 PM
Watching local TV news this morning, the anchor made mention of the camera... how great the view was... and how the camera failed shortly after launch. "$700,000 for a camera and it breaks the first time they use it."

The traffic reporter corrected him.

Kaptain K
2002-Oct-08, 05:42 PM
The camera was mounted to the external fuel tank. Therefore, if it survived re-entry, it is at the bottom of the ocean.

Doodler
2002-Oct-08, 05:52 PM
They need to put it further up the tank for a better view, if it won't put it in danger of being sheared off.

ToSeek
2002-Oct-08, 06:36 PM
On 2002-10-08 13:52, Doodler wrote:
They need to put it further up the tank for a better view, if it won't put it in danger of being sheared off.



I think the camera (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/station/sts112/020912shuttlecam/) is about as high up as it can be (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/station/sts112/020912shuttlecam/camlocation.jpg) without getting onto the curve at the front of the tank and facing out rather than down.

nebularain
2002-Oct-08, 06:52 PM
Actually, I would like the next camera to angle out just a little more so that we see more land/sea/sky-scape than shuttle-scape (or put another way, so that the view of the shuttle doesn't take up about half of the field of view!).

CJSF
2002-Oct-08, 07:20 PM
The purpose of the camera isn't just public relations. It also was designed to provide launch teams with an additonal resource for launch assesment and such.

CJSF



_________________
"Be very, very careful what you put into that head, because you will never,
ever get it out."
-Thomas Cardinal Wolsey (1471-1530)

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Christopher Ferro on 2002-10-08 15:20 ]</font>

Jigsaw
2002-Oct-08, 07:41 PM
That has to be the absolutely COOLEST video I have ever seen, except for the guys walking on the Moon and such. And you juuuuust get to catch of glimpse of the Earth's curvature before the booster separates and the camera goes bye-bye. Dang, can't those NASA Big Brains figure out a way to fasten it somewhere else where it can go all the way? I bet my kid brother could--give him some duct tape and some SuperGlue... /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

And it really brought home the "2800 mph" speed thing to me, 'cause I've never been able to really wrap my mind around that number, but seeing how fast the Earth fell away, I mean, like, that is some serious acceleration...

/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

Jim
2002-Oct-08, 07:46 PM
I think I see a way to handle everyone's problems with the camera... and tie up a loose end from another area.

We anchor a seat to the main fuel tank and get Lance Bass to sit in it holding a regular video camera. During liftoff, he can pan around based on instructions from Mission Control. Give him a parachute, and we can retrieve the camera for future missions.

Everyone gets the views they want, Bass gets to go into space, and we get the camera back.

ToSeek
2002-Oct-08, 07:59 PM
On 2002-10-08 15:46, Jim wrote:

Everyone gets the views they want, Bass gets to go into space, and we get the camera back.



The one disadvantage to your scheme is that we get Bass back. /phpBB/images/smiles/icon_wink.gif

CJSF
2002-Oct-08, 08:08 PM
On 2002-10-08 15:41, Jigsaw wrote:
And you juuuuust get to catch of glimpse of the Earth's curvature before the booster separates and the camera goes bye-bye.

Actually, the curvature isn't really visible from that low of an altitude (OK, well just barely) - it's a very wide angle lens, so most of the curvature is really a distortion. The same is true for most video or pics from the Shuttle/ISS of Earth's limb. They actually orbit too low for a true "round Earth" view. The curvature of the horizon isn't as dramatic as it appears. Not that BEING there wouldn't in itself be dramatic... sigh... (getting all wistful)

CJSF

_________________
"Be very, very careful what you put into that head, because you will never,
ever get it out."
-Thomas Cardinal Wolsey (1471-1530)

<font size=-1>[ This Message was edited by: Christopher Ferro on 2002-10-08 16:09 ]</font>

Jigsaw
2002-Oct-09, 06:30 PM
<< pouts >>
Well, it can BE the "curvature of the Earth" if I want it to be, so there...

/phpBB/images/smiles/icon_biggrin.gif

Jim
2002-Oct-09, 07:04 PM
The one disadvantage to your scheme is that we get Bass back.

Who said the parachute was for him? I said we'd get the camera back.