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View Full Version : Discussion: Seti Researcher Named To Top 100 List



Fraser
2004-Apr-19, 08:24 PM
SUMMARY: SETI researcher Jill Tarter has been named this week to Time Magazine's Top 100 "influential and powerful people" of the 20th Century - she was chosen for the "Scientist and Thinker" category. Tarter has devoted her life to the search for extraterrestrial civilizations by looking for radio signals coming from distant stars. She's currently overseeing the development of the Allen Telescope Array, which will have 32 radio dishes working as a single instrument later this year.

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

waldomi
2004-Apr-19, 09:43 PM
THERE'S DEFINITELY LIFE BESIDES OUR OWN OUT THERE. TO THINK OTHERWISE IS THE MOST EGOTISTIC VIEW IMAGINEABLE. IT ONLY SHOWS HOW IGNORANT MAN IS TO BELIEVE OF A BILLION STARS I'M THE ONLY ONE! WE THINK THE SAME IN OUR EVERY DAY AFFAIRS. I THINK THE DOCTOR WILL PROVE IT! OR THEY WILL STOP HER. 'MEN WITH VISION, CAN SEE'

nirvana
2004-Apr-20, 04:19 AM
I agree with you Waldomi. Britches are too small, and seems these "thinkers" have all outgrown theirs. I like what that lady is doing, I think the same as her but I dont have a career in it.

This ticked me off today, same line of thinking: Regarding the 5000 years old Germany Sun disk they just found, and debating whether the circle and crescent shapes were sun and crescent moon, or full moon and crescent moon....~~~It would have been too big an act of abstract thinking for our bronze age artist to visualize the Sun in a sky full of stars.

I guess we're all descended from drooling idiots who happened to have worked in gold and bronze, a very refined skill, doing astronomical artwork no less. Heh? I think their brains went to lunch.

Its like the Laos Field of Jars, look it up. Not a single human remain found, maybe one? And they chalk them up as 10foot, uncovered, solid stone carved jars meant to cremate/bury humans in. A kiln cave sitting right there with smoke evidence, natives relaying the legend they were molded from sand, clay, animal products and sugar into a stone of sorts --to me, they were for collecting rain for the caravan parties of traders. They form a straight, linear path all the way from Laos to Northern India. DUHHHHHH. These people, makes you wonder how they get their jobs. If earth can accidentally make stone with great heat from whats here, naturally, so can man with a kiln... we just forgot the recipe from our "stupid" drooling ancestors, I guess.

Guest
2004-Apr-20, 04:27 AM
They ignored the fact the stone isnt found in the country, that these jars are made of. OK...someone IMPORTED foreign stone (why?) to carve out ten foot tall jars (WHY? and how long, 5 years work each) to cremate a body that by then would be already disintegrated...with no lids on them. Theyre told by natives, they were for holding liquids...which one is debatable, but seems logical to me. No bones found in them, near them yes sometimes, but not an oustandingly apparent graveyard. They form a line (trade path) to india. How stupid can they get? Why do all artifacts get attributed to funerals, death, etc? Why cant an ax with a body be a guy who died from a tomahawk wound??? Why must it be an offering to the god AxWeilder etc etc , all this farout ridiculous overanalyzation? Even the mexican pyramids and columns have bubble marks from being molded. I dont think Cement is our only moldable stone. The ancient celts by legend, used beer and blood in their mortar and castles still stand 1000 years later. Chemistry happens when you put natural things into clay, and fire them in a kiln. Get real scientists!! :)

Has anyone taken the Laotian recipe of buffalo products, sugar, salt and clay, to make a new clay mixture, and then fired it? Or did we just write it off as too silly to believe? I guess only if a map or book is found do they believe anything legendary. Theres nothing like being told the legend with the fact in it, and then dismissing it for fantasy tangents.

loquatius
2004-Nov-01, 07:08 AM
I have been to the quarries where the 'Jars' are carved. There are lids at each of the first three 'Jar' sites.