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om@umr.edu
2004-May-21, 02:01 AM
The latest issue of Science (21 May 2004) reports new evidence that the Sun and the Earth were born in the chaos of massive stellar explosion(s).

The authors see no other possible explanation for the presence of iron-60 (Fe-60) in the early solar system. It is detected now as an excess of nickle-60 (Ni-60), the stable decay product of Fe-60.

Assuming the synthesis of iron is unrelated to its remarkably high abundance in the inner part of the Solar System, the authors conclude that the Fe-60 was injected into the Solar System from a nearby supernova.

http://space.com/scienceastronomy/sun_birt...rth_040520.html (http://space.com/scienceastronomy/sun_birth_040520.html)

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

StarLab
2004-May-21, 04:43 AM
Cool, Oliver!
Ahem, Just wondrin', shouldn't you keep this topic under your Iron Sun Discussion? Don't pull an ExtraSense - keep it all in one place. I enjoy your research, but I like the all-in-one-section method you've been using up til now...
Keep up the good work!

antoniseb
2004-May-21, 11:43 AM
This story has been posted down in the Iron Sun section, but I agree with Dr. Manuel that it deserves mention here too. This is an interesting topic, and goes beyond the bounds of looking at the Iron Sun theory.

om@umr.edu
2004-May-21, 11:50 AM
Originally posted by StarLab@May 21 2004, 04:43 AM
Cool, Oliver!

Ahem, Just wondrin', shouldn't you keep this topic under your Iron Sun Discussion? Don't pull an ExtraSense - keep it all in one place. I enjoy your research, but I like the all-in-one-section method you've been using up til now...

Keep up the good work!
Thanks, StarLab.

I posted it here, under Other Stories (Did Universe Today miss a story?), because the title for this section seemed to fit the situation.

Hopefully Fraser will post this news story from Arizona State University on the front page of Universe Today about iron-60 in the early solar system from a supernova decaying to nickel-60.

Fe-60 -> Ni-60

The most abundant isotope of iron, iron-56, is made in the supernova as the doubly-magic nuclide, nickel-56. Measurements on the debris of supernova SN1987A, show nickel-56 decaying to iron-56 there.

Ni-56 -> Fe-56

Conclusions of the Iron Sun discussion indicate this is the source of Fe-56 in the Earth and the Sun.

You are correct, StarLab, those conclusions are far reaching and will, if correct, impact a large number of other stories about the Universe Today.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

PS - I haven't checked out the ExtraSense section.

Duane
2004-May-21, 07:35 PM
This is interesting for sure. Another line of evidence suggesting that the cloud from which the sun and solar system formed was enriched by near-by supernova events.

As an aside, I understand the lead author of this study is one of Dr Manuel's grand-students (a student of a student). Congratulations Oliver, you must be quite proud of him :)

om@umr.edu
2004-May-21, 07:51 PM
Originally posted by Duane@May 21 2004, 07:35 PM
This is interesting for sure. Another line of evidence suggesting that the cloud from which the sun and solar system formed was enriched by near-by supernova events.

As an aside, I understand the lead author of this study is one of Dr Manuel's grand-students (a student of a student). Congratulations Oliver, you must be quite proud of him* :)
Thanks, Duane.

Yes, of course, the supernova was "near-by" indeed!

And yes, I am very proud of Dr. Gary Huss' accomplishments. He is not a co-author on this latest paper, but the paper is based on measurements of iron-60 reported by Shogo Tachibana and Gary Huss last year. Gary Huss, is the former student of my former student, E. Calvin Alexander. So the lineage for this measurement leads back to Francis William Aston.

Academically he is my grandson.

Biologically, he is the son of Glenn I. Huss - who operated the American Meteorite Laboratory for many years - and the grandson of H. H. Nininger - the genius who started collecting meteorites when the rest of the scientific community could hardly believe "rocks fall from the sky" or that they would have any scientific value.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

om@umr.edu
2004-May-25, 03:14 PM
WHEN AND WHERE WAS THE SUPERNOVA THAT MADE IRON-60?

1. When?

Beyond Bismith, Bi (Z = 83), all elements are radioactive and are only made in supernovae. Even numbered elements like Th (Z = 90), U (Z = 92), Pu (Z = 94) are longer lived and still existed when the solar system formed.

These actinide elements and their decay products are "clocks" that accurately tell:

a. The solar system's age, and

b. When the supernova exploded.

For example, Clair Patterson showed in the 1950's that the Earth and most meteorites formed about 4.6 billion years ago.

In the 1990's Kuroda and Myers combined Thorium/Uranium/Plutonium age dating to show a supernova exploded 5 billion years ago and made our actinide elements (Th, U, Pu).

2. Where?

In 1991 Qi-Lu, a student of Professor Akimasa Masuda at the University of Tokyo, reported that the seven stable isotopes of Molybdenum are unmixed in the massive iron meteorites that even now fall from the sky [Qi-Lu, Doctoral Thesis, University of Tokyo, (1991)].

Qi-Lu and Masuda reported this unexpected finding at the 1998 meeting of the Meteoritical Society in Dublin, Ireland [Meteoritics & Planetary Science 33 (1998) A99].

Glenn Seaborg and I included this important discovery the next year in the Proceedings of the 1999 ACS Symposium on the "Origin of Elements in the Solar System" in New Orleans.

B2FH (1957) describe the different stellar nucleosynthesis reactions that make the seven stable isotopes of Molybdenum - Mo (Z = 42).

Qi-Lu and Masuda had discovered a "frozen" record of stellar nuclear reactions in iron meteorites!

Measurements at other well-equipped laboratories, including as I recall the one at Harvard, have confirmed this land-mark discovery from the University of Tokyo.

Thus the bulk material of iron meteorites came from the core of the same supernova that made Iron-60 here 5,000 million years ago.

Massive chunks of iron that fall from the sky come directly from the supernova core!

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

DippyHippy
2004-May-25, 09:23 PM
Wow - so it's possible that today's iron-rich meteorites may have been in the core of a supernova? Excellent! :)

om@umr.edu
2004-May-25, 10:06 PM
Originally posted by DippyHippy@May 25 2004, 09:23 PM
Wow - so it's possible that today's iron-rich meteorites may have been in the core of a supernova? Excellent! :)
You are right, DippyHippy.

The iron cores of the terrestrial planets and the iron-rich Sun also came from the central region of a supernova.

Let's go to the Iron Sun discussion so I can answer criticisms from Duane and antoniseb.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

om@umr.edu
2004-May-30, 07:52 PM
The Iron Sun discussion is at:

http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.p...ic=2544&st=300& (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=2544&st=300&)

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om