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View Full Version : Discussion: Heaviest Stars Are Twins



Fraser
2004-May-26, 05:10 PM
SUMMARY: Astronomers with the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics have found the heaviest star ever seen - 80 times the mass of our Sun - and it's got a twin. Located 20,000 light-years from Earth, the two massive stars in WR 20a go around each other every 3.7 days. These two stars are very young, probably only 2-3 million years old, and highly unstable. It'll only be a few more million years before they explode, one after the other as supernovas.

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

galaxygirl
2004-May-26, 06:42 PM
I've been to the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics a couple of times, and I know a few of the people who worked on this finding (which I didnt realize, until now...). Pretty neat!

Guest_scott712
2004-May-29, 02:52 AM
How fast do they travel as they orbit one another?

Littlemews
2004-May-29, 03:06 AM
What is the chance for this types of star to form a black hole right after they die?

GOURDHEAD
2004-Jun-02, 02:54 PM
What is the chance for this types of star to form a black hole right after they die?

It's safe to bet your lunch money that each will. Too bad we won't be around to watch. Let' leave a note for those on watch then.

Deep_Eye
2004-Jun-02, 02:56 PM
What happens when two black holes try to comsume each other?

John L
2004-Jun-02, 03:16 PM
Originally posted by Deep_Eye@Jun 2 2004, 09:56 AM
What happens when two black holes try to comsume each other?
It is supposed to create intense gravitational energy in the form of gravity waves that some of the gravity wave observatories are trying to detect. Unfortunately all they ever detect are big trucks driving by, but that's because they're on the Earth. A new space based one is in the works that will not have this problem.

Otherwise, the two black holes should merge into one with a mass equal to the sum of the two original black holes.

Deep_Eye
2004-Jun-02, 03:19 PM
Thats cool, I bet they give off a huge amount of energy and radiation when they merge. It would be a spectacular site to see, thats for sure!