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Fraser
2004-Jun-03, 11:47 PM
SUMMARY: Astronomers with the European Southern Observatory have embarked on a decade-long study of some of the largest structures, galaxy clusters, to try and understand the nature of the earliest Universe. According to the widely accepted "inflationary theory" of the cosmos, tiny fluctuations in the initial state of the Universe were magnified by the Big Bang. Microscopic differences at the beginning have become super-clusters of galaxies. A previous survey used X-ray observatories to identify 447 of the brightest clusters of galaxies, which will now be studied further to map out their shape.

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Deep_Eye
2004-Jun-03, 11:55 PM
tiny fluctuations in the initial state of the Universe were magnified by the Big Bang. Microscopic differences at the beginning have become super-clusters of galaxies

What type of fluctuations? And how would a change that small result in a structure as large as a super-cluster of galaxies? Somewhere I heard he name 'mega-cluster,' are those clusters of super-clusters? This is one of the most interesting stories I've read about for quite awhile, where did you find it? Because I subscribe to the daily email, but haven't seen anything in one of them.

Littlemews
2004-Jun-04, 12:15 AM
I hope they can publish this article in the Astronomy magzine, therefore we know more details about how they mapping the structure of those cluster of galaxies.

Deep_Eye
2004-Jun-04, 12:28 AM
So are the current supercomputer models of the universe structure not very accurate?

James Friesen
2004-Jun-04, 01:51 AM
From what little I know of Big Bang science, the universe may have begun from a singularity, or something equivalently small, so minor inconsistencies early on would manifest as incredibly huge inconsistencies after expansion.

For example, one theory I have read suggests that once the temperature dropped to a point where raw energy could turn into particles, the number of anti-particles approximately matched the number of 'normal' particles. There was a 'small' inconsistency, however, in that anti-particles were outnumbered slightly by the normal particles.

Particles and anti-particles cancel each other out if they intereact, and after most of the matter in the universe interacted, and canceled itself out by turning back into energy, the so-called minor surplus of normal particles left over went on to form most of the matter in the stars and galaxies of our present day universe.

For a statistical anomally, our universe of surplus particles is sure one heck of a big, and beautifull, fluke!