PDA

View Full Version : Discussion: Europeans Agree To Build ...



Fraser
2004-Jun-10, 05:24 PM
SUMMARY: The European Space Agency has decided on how it will contribute to the construction of the next generation James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), due for launch in 2011. The Europeans will work with the USA on the Mid-Infrared Instrument (MIRI), which is one of four instruments on board JWST. MIRI will be used to study old and distant stellar populations, dust obscured regions of star formation, and comets and Kuiper Belt objects. JWST will be three times larger than Hubble and be able to resolve objects 10 to 100,000 times better depending on the wavelength and type of observation.

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2004-Jun-11, 01:38 PM
what a great telescope, we will understand a whole lot more about the universe
I hope the put this into action as soon as possible
this is wonderful
:lol:

John L
2004-Jun-11, 08:53 PM
Originally posted by Taikonaut Dongfang Hong@Jun 11 2004, 08:38 AM
what a great telescope, we will understand a whole lot more about the universe. I hope the put this into action as soon as possible. This is wonderful.
I agree, and this is what's replacing the Hubble. This telescope is the only I reason I don't have a problem with scrapping Hubble. It'll do what the Hubble does times 10!

Duane
2004-Jun-11, 09:19 PM
Just not in visible light :(

Guest
2004-Jul-29, 08:37 AM
http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/spcs/j...ills_SK_sm2.jpg (http://esamultimedia.esa.int/images/spcs/jwst/JWST_stills_SK_sm2.jpg)


28 July 2004

ESA has awarded EADS Astrium GmbH with the contract to build the Near–Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec) instrument on board the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST).
NIRSpec is a 200-kilogram spectrograph able to detect the radiation from the most distant galaxies and can observe more than 100 objects simultaneously. It will be able to operate at a temperature of 35 degrees Kelvin (-238°C) to maximize its sensitivity. It will host state-of-the-art mirrors made of silicon carbide (SiC), a material with excellent properties for stable optical structures operating at cryogenic temperatures.