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Fraser
2004-Jun-15, 04:14 PM
SUMMARY: Cassini made its closest approach to Saturn's moon Phoebe on June 11, and the pictures are in. This photo is a skyline view of Phoebe that shows how the darker surface has been swept away in some areas to reveal the brighter material underneath. Scientists will be analyzing these pictures for years to try and understand the mechanism at work here. The large crater in this picture is 45 km (28 miles) in diameter, and the rim shows the greatest amount of this streaking.

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2004-Jun-15, 11:35 PM
the images have been wonderful I wonder what else cassini-huygens will discover in this mission ?

TuTone
2004-Jun-16, 12:41 AM
They are nice! Is it possible that Phoebe is a meteorite?

antoniseb
2004-Jun-16, 01:13 AM
Originally posted by TuTone@Jun 16 2004, 12:41 AM
Is it possible that Phoebe is a meteorite?
Technically no. A meteorite is a small space rock that has fallen to Earth [or otherwise struck a larger object in which it is now embedded].

Perhaps you meant something else. If you rephrase your question we can take another shot at it.

madman
2004-Jun-16, 12:44 PM
there seems to be a blister with a crater at the centre...volcano and caldera?

http://hometown.aol.com.au/Profnim/blister.jpg

VanderL
2004-Jun-16, 01:36 PM
Ahh, I hate it when I don't see what I'm supposed to see.

What blister!! :unsure:

Maybe I should look at what the "Electric cratering" is supposed to show on this surface (is it certain to be ice?) and why it looks like a comet (compare it to comet Wild2).

Cheers.

Eric Vaxxine
2004-Jun-16, 01:45 PM
Yeah...dead centre...the raised bit with a hole in the centre.....very odd looking.
Does this moon rotate, and what kind of gravity would be going on?

antoniseb
2004-Jun-16, 02:08 PM
Originally posted by Eric Vaxxine@Jun 16 2004, 01:45 PM
Yeah...dead centre...the raised bit with a hole in the centre.....very odd looking.
Does this moon rotate, and what kind of gravity would be going on?
That is odd looking. It's also about 12 miles across.

This moon rotates every nine hours. Its gravity would require an orbital velocity of between one and two hundred miles an hour for a low orbit, and 40% more to escape.

VanderL
2004-Jun-16, 02:16 PM
Aha, After I downloaded the image and corrected the brightness I finally see what the blister/crater is. Phew, this looks indeed like a small volcano, (what is the size of the crater?). That's indeed really odd, you don't expect a "volcano" on this moon (nothing is heating it from inside, I suppose).
It would fit with electrical scarring, where discharges could form almost any landscape visible on this surface, including craters, caldera's, sharp cliffs, sinuous rilles and "Lichtenberg patterns". I'll try to scan the rest of Phoebe and see what features are fitting, if y'all don't mind.


Cheers.