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Fraser
2004-Jun-16, 06:05 PM
SUMMARY: The Canadian-built MOST space telescope has shed new light on how stars like our own Sun can actually be quite turbulent, vibrating and flaring up unexpectedly. MOST tracked a star called eta Bootis for 28 straight days without interruption, and measured its brightness more than 250,000 times - 10 times more accurately than any previous instrument could reach. MOST should also assist planet hunters by watching how a star brightens and dims as planets pass in front of it, similar to Venus' recent transit across the face of the Sun.

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StarLab
2004-Jun-16, 06:53 PM
Well, is this star that MOST is studying in the exact same age and sequence as our star, the sun?

antoniseb
2004-Jun-16, 08:06 PM
This is a pretty cool and cheap mision. One change in astronomy recently is that we are starting to look at the details of the more ordinary objects instead of simply hunting for the most and biggest. There's a lot of theory about the life-cycle of stars, but it is good to back it up with observation, and then refine the theory.

VanderL
2004-Jun-16, 09:31 PM
This is a pretty cool and cheap mision. One change in astronomy recently is that we are starting to look at the details of the more ordinary objects instead of simply hunting for the most and biggest. There's a lot of theory about the life-cycle of stars, but it is good to back it up with observation, and then refine the theory.

Spot on Antoniseb! It's always rewarding to take a good hard look at the details, especially objects that are not completely understood. The images of the Sun have recently gained a lot more detail; sunspots are studied, but I have never seen any detailed movies that show what exactly happens there. This project is having a long hard look at other stars, I hope it will give us more insight on what is responsible for the sunpot-cycle, and the expanding/contraction of stars.


Cheers.

Victoria
2004-Jun-16, 10:19 PM
I AM still and will always be impressed with the scientific "junk looking" materials in space that give us such insight. Congrats MOST!!!!