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View Full Version : Discussion: Saturn's Southern Storms



Fraser
2004-Jun-17, 04:22 PM
SUMMARY: The latest image from Cassini shows four dark turbulent storms in Saturn's southern hemisphere. Storms like this are short lived, and will often merge together, or spawn new storms. This image was taken over a month ago, on May 15, when the spacecraft was 24.7 million km (15.3 million miles) away from Saturn. Cassini will arrive at Saturn at the end of June.

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2004-Jun-17, 05:38 PM
cassini pictures have been great, I think the Cassini-huygens mission was a great idea

amber
2004-Jun-18, 01:49 AM
If they wouldnt have pitures of Saturn we wouldnt know to much about it, so i am very glad tat it went there! :D

VanderL
2004-Jun-18, 01:23 PM
Do we see these "storm mergers" on other planets as well? I wonder if the behaviour of these storms are comparable to sunspots; if I remember correctly they too can merge or split.


Cheers.

Guest_Victoria
2004-Jun-20, 12:22 AM
Missed the storm-hope to be there the 1st week of June :P Cassini ( :huh: spell check <_< ) has always been brilliant. :P

Algenon the mouse
2004-Jun-20, 07:27 PM
I was wondering how much water was in these storms. Would it be possible to utilize the water in a colonization attempt on one of the moons of Saturn?

VanderL
2004-Jun-21, 06:21 PM
Would it be possible to utilize the water in a colonization attempt on one of the moons of Saturn?

Maybe the water is already available on Titan, the hypothesis is that Titan has a hydrocarbon ocean, but some say there is water/ice on the surface. That means we can colonize whenever we&#39;re ready.
Let&#39;s see what the Huygens probe will find when it plunges into that ocean.

Cheers.

Duane
2004-Jun-21, 09:58 PM
Do we see these "storm mergers" on other planets as well? I wonder if the behaviour of these storms are comparable to sunspots; if I remember correctly they too can merge or split.

Yes VanderL, all of the gas giants have been seen to have storms merging on them by Voyager.

They are very different from sunspots. The planetary storms are basically large hurricanes that develope in the very deep atmospheres of the giant planets. They have done modelling with centrifuges filled with different densities of liquids and were able to get the layering you see on the giant planets. They even got a relatively stable big red spot like you see on Jupiter.

Sunspots are not storms per se, at least not in the same sense as the storms on the giant planets (or even here on Earth). They have something more to do with the suns magnetic field and the interplay of plasmas, convection and CME&#39;s.

VanderL
2004-Jun-22, 03:12 PM
Thanks Duane,

I didn&#39;t know about the modelling, indeed sunspots are different from the storms on gas giants, but I was only referring to the patterns; the merging and splitting phenomenon. Apparently these storms can behave in the same manner as sunspots, even though they are very different.

Cheers.

Victoria
2004-Jun-22, 04:51 PM
Interesting all the same, thanks for the great insight&#33;

bettitina
2004-Jul-08, 07:06 AM
hello we are internettourists from germany :D and we have to search information about hurricans for school :angry: