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Fraser
2004-Jun-23, 04:55 PM
SUMMARY: The Chandra X-Ray Observatory has revealed an extremely hot region at the heart of our Milky Way galaxy. A team of astronomers from UCLA turned Chandra's gaze on a region approximately 100 light-years across, and then painstakingly removed the glow from more than 2,500 point sources of X-ray radiation (neutron stars, black holes, etc). What remained was the characteristic radiation from gas being heated to 100 million degrees. It could be that the glow isn't coming from gas, but a collection of point sources, like a cluster of 200,000 neutron stars.

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

the white guy
2004-Jun-23, 08:31 PM
In my opinion I dont believe in such things as black holes and other unvierses. I think this is all make believe. Just like the first landing in the moon. WE all know it was filmed in someones basement. What I dont understand is why we are so fascinated with the rest of the universe. Haven&#39;t we learned not to meddle in other affairs. We will just cause problems for our selves in the future. Before you know it we&#39;ll be wanting to live on the moon and sooner or later we will mess up the moon&#39;s orbit and cause to crash into the earth causing oblivion. Now don&#39;t get me wrong. It&#39;s good that we&#39;re curious, but curiousity killed the cat. <_<

antoniseb
2004-Jun-23, 10:47 PM
Originally posted by the white guy@Jun 23 2004, 08:31 PM
Now don&#39;t get me wrong.
I assume you are just yanking our chain. Black holes exist. The Lunar landings were not faked. The moon will not crash into the Earth. You&#39;ll probably get some agreement on the other universes thing. You wouldn&#39;t be on this forum if you weren&#39;t fascinated with the rest of the universe like the rest of us.

StarLab
2004-Jun-24, 01:01 AM
Now don&#39;t get me wrong.


I assume you are just yanking our chain. Black holes exist.
of course he&#39;s just yanking our chain&#33; He said so himself, he&#39;s a WHITE GUY&#33; :lol: <_< :ph34r: :rolleyes: :o



It could be that the glow isn&#39;t coming from gas, but a collection of point sources, like a cluster of 200,000 neutron stars. That&#39;d be extremely scary&#33; :o :ph34r:

Greg
2004-Jun-24, 04:18 AM
LOL. I do not know why he is flaming this little article. The post is a valueless distraction, and I will promptly forget about it as a result. This article however is quite interesting. I prefer the theory that neutron stars, pulsars and black holes may be heating the gas. What is most likely to be found near the center of the galaxy are remmenants from its early history, objects with the lowest angular momentum compared to objects of higher momentum captured later on. The oldest stars were also more likely to be massive and result in these stellar remmenants. Maybe we should get Oliver to comment on this. I have been wanting to offer him a possible solution for his question of where all the neutron stars might be if not in the center of main sequence stars.

Algenon the mouse
2004-Jun-24, 04:25 PM
That is really amazing. I wonder how that many neutron stars wound up in the same area. It would be an interesting trip, one way, but interesting.



"Maybe we should get Oliver to comment on this. I have been wanting to offer him a possible solution for his question of where all the neutron stars might be if not in the center of main sequence stars" I agree with you greg. I have been wondering about this.

Spacemad
2004-Jun-24, 07:27 PM
It seems to me that 200,000 neutron stars in such a relatively small zone of the Milky Way (100 light years) is rather an exaggeration. Perhaps a few thousand but 100īs of 1,000īs :unsure: &#33;

Still with a lot more investigation perhaps this mystery can be cleared up&#33; It was interesting to see how black holes & pulsars could be eliminated from the picture leaving only the hot gases&#33;

Wouldnīt the infrared telescope (damm, I just canīt remember its name at this moment&#33;) reveal a lot of what is going on behind the scenes?

The infrared telescope has turned up some very good & interesting images of late&#33;
I really didnīt expect to see such breath taking images from an infrared telescope&#33; :)

Chandraīs images are extremely good as well.

What I like most of all is when they combine images taken from all three space telescopes - Hubble, Chandra & the infrared one&#33; These images are real jewels in NASAīs crown & just go to show just what can be done by combining images taken at different wave lengths&#33; Iīd really love to see many more of these combined wavelength images&#33; :)