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Fraser
2004-Jul-28, 05:58 PM
SUMMARY: Astronomers have tracked a fast moving binary pair of objects back to the original stellar nursery that they were ejected from 1.7 million years ago. The binary is classified as a microquasar, where a regular star 17 times the mass of our Sun is orbiting a neutron star or black hole. The regular star in this pairing exactly matches several other stars in a nearby cluster of stars, so the astronomers are fairly certain that's where they originated. It's believed that that black hole or neutron star was much more massive than the companion star, but it exploded as a supernova millions of years ago.

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Guest
2004-Jul-28, 06:22 PM
amazing what's going on out there in space

lswinford
2004-Jul-28, 10:25 PM
There was some discussion in the Iron Sun thread that made me think of that when reading this. Some of the "strange Xenon" (unexpected isotopes) that were observed either had to come from another star system or was formed from our sun being a less-than-normal-massed neutron star which reaccreted a hydrogen shell. One conjecture was that we too (as in an early sol) were somehow sent on a long and distant journey, possibly picking up a thing or two in the interim. Perhaps this is the kind of mechanism that propelled us from our nursery to this place in our galactic arm that does not appear to have any such nebulosity one might normally expect our star to arise from. Pity we don't have a good grasp of our course lest we draw the arc back to the place where we might have begun. I wonder if more than time and distance have erased such a trail from that which kicked us out and into place in space.

antoniseb
2004-Jul-29, 11:17 AM
Originally posted by lswinford@Jul 28 2004, 10:25 PM
Perhaps this is the kind of mechanism that propelled us from our nursery to this place in our galactic arm that does not appear to have any such nebulosity one might normally expect our star to arise from. Pity we don't have a good grasp of our course lest we draw the arc back to the place where we might have begun. I wonder if more than time and distance have erased such a trail from that which kicked us out and into place in space.
Hi lswinford,

We do not need to have been propelled to escape the cloud of a stellar nursery. These clouds are relatively short lived [perhaps a billion years] compared to the sun, and get evaporated or blown away from the heat and wind of the large stars that form inside them. In the five billion years our sun has been around, it would certainly have had a few subtle gravitational interactions that would have supplied the three miles per second average drift we have against the neighboring stars [A supernova kick would have given us ten to thirty miles a second].

Also, we do have a pretty good grasp of the course we are on, and are fairly sure that a few million years ago, we were passing through part of the Orion Nebula.

lswinford
2004-Jul-29, 08:29 PM
And do you happen to recall or possibly suggest where I could read about our supposed trajectory and journey through the Orion nebula?

antoniseb
2004-Jul-29, 08:39 PM
Originally posted by lswinford@Jul 29 2004, 08:29 PM
And do you happen to recall or possibly suggest where I could read about our supposed trajectory and journey through the Orion nebula?
Sure, there's a link to it in the first posting in this thread.
Sun's Path (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=2745)

zephyr46
2004-Jul-30, 05:57 AM
This is the second micro quasar I have heard about.

the first being XTE J1550-564 at Solstation.com (http://solstation.com/x-objects/xte-bh.htm).

lswinford
2004-Aug-02, 10:08 PM
Antoniseb, thanks for the link. Now to dig up thoses sources cited.

There's a lot of relative action inferred between those bubbles. Do you know if there are (or were, as in perhaps before budget changes) any series' planned to probe the heliosphere and interstellar medium characteristics besides the Voyagers? It would be interesting to determine the distances to the solar system boundaries, as well as measure what is there. One would expect, as the article bore out, that it would be denser (as if those miniscule masses could be called dense) and relatively hotter (as if those super-sub frigid temperatures could be called 'hot') in the direction of our travel and more distant, thinner, and cooler in the direction behind us. That 60-ish million year occilation is interesting too. One thing that belonged in that place, however, is whether the galactic plane has a wobble too. Since that did not also define the relative motion of our neighborhood and galactic arm and galaxy in general it could be that we are in a rearward swing to catch up with a galaxy that marches on, as the author described our "inward" motion.

Thanks again for something with substance to dig into for a while, another bone to chew.

Signalis
2004-Aug-12, 11:09 AM
Originally posted by fraser@Jul 28 2004, 05:58 PM
SUMMARY: Astronomers have tracked a fast moving binary pair of objects back to the original stellar nursery that they were ejected from 1.7 million years ago. The binary is classified as a microquasar, where a regular star 17 times the mass of our Sun is orbiting a neutron star or black hole. The regular star in this pairing exactly matches several other stars in a nearby cluster of stars, so the astronomers are fairly certain that's where they originated. It's believed that that black hole or neutron star was much more massive than the companion star, but it exploded as a supernova millions of years ago.

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.
I think this is part of process governed by the true hidden stucture of the universe.
I believe nothing is irregular but ,in fact all actions are to achieve a balance within the universe.

The Signalis