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View Full Version : Discussion: Quintuplet Cluster Imaged by Chandra



Fraser
2004-Jul-29, 03:59 PM
SUMMARY: The Chandra X-Ray Observatory has taken this image of a mysterious group of stars called the Quintuplet Cluster. This dense cluster of stars is located near the centre of our Milky Way, and actually contains hundreds of young stars, but they're obscured by thick dust. In fact it wasn't even discovered until 1990 when it was located with an infrared telescope that can peer through the dust. The bright concentrations in the image aren't stars, but points where powerful winds from the young, hot stars are colliding and being superheated to 50 million degrees Celsius.

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Guest
2004-Jul-29, 04:45 PM
fantastic what x-ray can find in outer space

antoniseb
2004-Jul-29, 05:35 PM
The center of our galaxy is a fascinating place. I hope that someday we can build the equipment needed to see all of these things clearly.

Eric Vaxxine
2004-Jul-30, 09:43 AM
Superheated winds !!?? The universe sure is a fascinating laboratory. Are the stars obscured or are they not in the area imaged?

antoniseb
2004-Jul-30, 11:23 AM
Originally posted by Eric Vaxxine@Jul 30 2004, 09:43 AM
Are the stars obscured or are they not in the area imaged?
They are obscured, so they are only visible from Earth at far infrared wavelengths, which we don't image well yet.

Eric Vaxxine
2004-Jul-30, 02:33 PM
Thank You Antoniseb.

StarLab
2004-Jul-31, 05:55 AM
How do we know that these "superheated winds" are not what would possibly form stars? Is there any evidence suggesting stars like our own sun could have been formed in this way, or are the circumstances different here on the outer rim?

Eric Vaxxine
2004-Aug-03, 09:04 AM
I am still trying to get to grips with superheated wind is visible, but the stars are not? Is that because the stars are cooler than the wind? Or is the wind the other side of the dust

antoniseb
2004-Aug-03, 11:05 AM
Originally posted by Eric Vaxxine@Aug 3 2004, 09:04 AM
Is that because the stars are cooler than the wind?
Yes the stars do not give off nearly as many x-rays as the wind does when it interacts with wind from other stars, and the inter-stellar media [ISM]. The wind is thousands of times hotter than the stars.