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amadrieclya
2004-Aug-02, 03:06 PM
So i'd like to know what's a good book to read about space.....a non fiction book.
I want one that is interesting stuff....not boring..........does any one have any recommendations?

StarLab
2004-Aug-02, 03:19 PM
What kind of 'space.' General Info, Astronomy, Cosmology, History of NASA, Astrophysics, what? I can tell you about loads, but I need some specifics.

David S
2004-Aug-02, 03:29 PM
Have you read any of Stephen Hawkings books? "A Brief History of Time" and "The Universe in a Nutshell" are both excellent books, and I highly recomend them. He talks about some very complex subjects and puts them in relatively easy to understand terms. The diagrams in particular in his books are wonderful, and they help tremendously with explaining how things like quantum mechanics and general relativity work.

If you haven't read them, deffinetly check them out from a library.

amadrieclya
2004-Aug-02, 03:33 PM
thanks for posting book titles.
and to the first reply...i didn't look at the username......umm ANY info that will really influence me to want to study in the field of astronomy. I'm in 11th grade and the solor system intrigues (sp?) me. Books on theories that also include arguements to disprove theories etc.....

Tinaa
2004-Aug-02, 03:37 PM
Here (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=3977) are a few reviews. Here are some more reviews. (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/books.html)

amadrieclya
2004-Aug-02, 03:38 PM
thanks so much. i really do appreciate it.
-liliana

Guest
2004-Aug-03, 11:44 PM
Try:

"Black Holes and Time Warps" by Kip Thorne
"The Biological Universe" by Steve Dick
"The Alchemy of the Heavens" and "The Universe at Midnight" by Ken Croswell
"Beyond Pluto" by John Davies.

All these books are thorough and substantial but also readable and entertaining.

MyHeadHurts
2004-Aug-05, 07:31 PM
Cosmos by carl sagan is excellent.....a bit dated...but its "big picture" kinda book
:ph34r:

lswinford
2004-Aug-06, 03:19 PM
I think something like this site's news and related links or something like space.com or other science news sites are a great place for reading. They let you link, especially the NASA or JPL pages, to some of the probes and satellite observatory's pages. There they present some of the grandest pictures along with descriptions that begin wonderfully easy but let you link or branch to increasingly more technical and complex. This lets me, at least, dig as deep as I have time or understanding for, or skim across the broad generalities as I choose. In many of these places you will find far more current and accurate information than previously published books.

Good luck in your search.