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View Full Version : Discussion: Dying Star Leaves a Ring Behind



Fraser
2004-Aug-10, 05:55 PM
SUMMARY: NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope took this image of a dying star in the middle of a doughnut of leftover gas and dust. The dying star is is part of a planetary nebula, called NGC 246, which used to be similar to our own Sun, but it expended all its fuel and then boiled off its outer layers. Spitzer "sees" in the infrared spectrum, which allows it to peer through most of the obscuring material and get a much better look at the star and its surroundings. NGC 246 is located 1,800 light-years away in the Cetus constellation of our galaxy.

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om@umr.edu
2004-Aug-10, 06:57 PM
The observation of a mysterious ring of material, first around SN1987A and now around another dying star, is great news.

Such observations may help us understand how our planetary system formed out of fresh stellar debris 4-5 Gy ago.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

Duane
2004-Aug-12, 08:51 AM
Or what our star will look like in 4-5 Gys ;)

antoniseb
2004-Aug-12, 10:22 AM
Originally posted by om@umr.edu@Aug 10 2004, 06:57 PM
The observation of a mysterious ring of material, first around SN1987A and now around another dying star, is great news.
Mysterious? Should we send Scooby-Doo to investigate? I don't think so. We see rings in many places, and SN1987a was certainly not the first. Discounting Saturn, I'm guessing the first observed ring was probably the Ring Nebula in Lyra [which is also a ring around a dying star].

om@umr.edu
2004-Aug-12, 05:35 PM
Originally posted by antoniseb@Aug 12 2004, 10:22 AM
Discounting Saturn, I'm guessing the first observed ring was probably the Ring Nebula in Lyra [which is also a ring around a dying star].
You are right, Anton.

There is also the ring of planets orbiting the Sun.

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om