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Fraser
2004-Aug-24, 07:49 PM
SUMMARY: This is a detailed image of an exploded star called Cassiopeia A, taken by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory. The space-based observatory focused on this remnant for 1 million seconds (just over 11 days), and revealed the bright outer green ring 10 light years across which was generated by the shockwave from the supernova explosion. Two large jets extend outside this shockwave on opposite sides, and contain large quantities of silicon. This means they were formed early on in the explosion; otherwise, they'd contain mostly iron from the star's central regions.

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

VanderL
2004-Aug-24, 09:39 PM
Thanks Fraser, you always do come up with the better, detailed pictures of the same story compared to other sites. Silicon and Iron, I bet Oliver will have some thoughts about the composition of supernova remnants.

My question would be how come an exploding star forms jets, I thought they were reserved for black holes and pulsars. Come to think of it, most energetic processes show bipolar features, so how do they do it?

Cheers.

StarLab
2004-Aug-24, 11:13 PM
Silicon and Iron, I bet Oliver will have some thoughts about the composition of supernova remnants.
If he does respond in this string, I shall puke offline. ;) :lol: B) :D

om@umr.edu
2004-Aug-25, 12:12 AM
Great news, Fraser!

Observations show dying stars frequently ejecting matter asymmetrically, rather than isotropically.

Observations show the stellar debris is not necessarily mixed.

In this latest report, "Clouds of iron that have remained nearly pure for the approximately 340 years since the explosion were also detected."

Wasn't there another recent news story about the finding of short-lived Fe-60 in the early solar system from the core of a supernova?

Hmmmm.

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

VanderL
2004-Aug-25, 03:04 PM
Are you okay Starlab? :)



Cheers.

Fraser
2004-Aug-25, 04:00 PM
Sorry, I make a mistake with that article. It should have been Cassiopeia A, not Centaurus A. I've fixed the error.

StarLab
2004-Aug-25, 04:24 PM
Hmm...well, I didn't puke, but my cat did just now...nice little (actually huge) hairball on my parents' bed.