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imported_ROB
2004-Sep-24, 07:48 AM
Hi
i have just been reading an article that claims that life was brought to the early earth in side comets along with most of the earths water.
not actual life but organic compounds of carbon the building blocks of life.
it claims that around 4500 ma ago the earth was under heavy bombardment from projectiles, these carried frozen water and created our atmosphere and could have helped the spark that turned the early atmosphere in to amino acid chains as experiments in labs have shown.
i thought this was amazing justt think we are all looking for aliens when we actually we could be the aliens.
what do you think???

Ola D.
2004-Sep-24, 09:04 AM
I once read in an article that our solar system is a result of a huge supernova ( A massive explosion ). So all the elements found on Earth and all the other planets are reminents of this supernova.. I actually don't know how true this statement is, but it's interesting to think about it :)

GOURDHEAD
2004-Sep-24, 02:56 PM
I thought this was amazing just think we are all looking for aliens when we actually we could be the aliens. What do you think?

Your description points more to indigenous self organization than to aliens. Chances are many nova and supernova contributed to the protostellar cloud from which we precipated and that a single one initiated the compression of the cloud that lead to the formation of the solar system. Even if the microbes that have lead to us were riding along in the cloud before compression (panspermia), it would be a stretch to call us aliens; certainly not in the sense the term is commonly used.

Semantic juggling of multiple entendres in a play on difficult to avoid ambiguities in an attempt to draw false inferences is more the despicable trick employed by slick (non-truth seeking) debaters than a proper discourse aimed at logical inquiry.

If, on the other hand, the panspermic microbes developed for a while on Mars or some other location and their advanced progeny were transported to earth via meteroid, they begin to qualify as aliens especially if they did in those that were developing here.

ASEI
2004-Sep-24, 03:03 PM
I don't see why life had to have originated anywhere else. If it did, that merely moves the point of life's origin. It did originate somewhere.

muunbiem
2004-Sep-24, 03:34 PM
I think it comes down to whether or not DNA is an Earth "creation", following physical laws, as it would pertain to the physical CONDITIONS found in the matter that came together to make up our planet, relative to the proximity, size, and elements that make up our sun, or is a product of the evolution of the universe itself, maybe not just remnants blasted out of some other world. Maybe DNA is an inevidable universal "code" made from complex organic compounds derived from the mixing of matter according to the physical "laws" of our universe. Maybe there is some other "code", or "method" of combining matter in such a way, as to create reproductive, possibly "intelligent" life. Maybe this "DNA thing" is just a fluke, and most, if not the rest of the "life" in the universe is based on some other paradigm altogether. We might not even be able to recognize each other as "lifeforms", yet BOTH of us can have a cognizant awareness of our existance in this universe.

Ouch. I think it's time for the mid-day spleef... :blink:

GOURDHEAD
2004-Sep-24, 10:16 PM
I don't see why life had to have originated anywhere else.

It did not have to, but it could have. My guess is that earth life originated on earth, but it didn't have to. Since it could have originated here, it's very likely to have spontaneously arisen in many other places.

ulgah
2004-Sep-26, 12:54 AM
Of course, we evolved anywhere but, in a primordial puddle of slime on Earth! :D

ASEI
2004-Sep-26, 01:54 AM
Well, earth seems to have the best conditions for it. It probably always had the best conditions for it - liquid oceans exposed to sunlight, even during the primordial eras when our atmosphere was heavy with carbon dioxide and volcanic gas. So life had a good chance of originating here.

ulgah
2004-Sep-26, 03:12 AM
ASEI, I hope you realize that was a spoof, I fully believe that life arose here, and chances of it rising again, somewhere else is nil. Ask any" REAL CHEMIST." But in the mean time we can continue dreaming, and thinking about our "space games."

astromark
2004-Sep-27, 03:54 AM
:o :huh: Just for the fun of it I had a look at the NOVA site. and in there I found a link to a Question and rethink quiz. A Mr ward fellow seems to know what he's talking about. After reading and being very possitive about the question. By the time I finnished this thing.... No I still think its out there, but we may never see or hear from them. He puts up a good argument... Bugger. :angry:

GOURDHEAD
2004-Sep-27, 11:45 AM
I fully believe that life arose here, and chances of it rising again, somewhere else is nil. Ask any" REAL CHEMIST."

It may be even better to ask all the chemists, well, at least a few thousand, and a few stochastically fluent bio-physicists and some of the ballets performed by chaos. Check out my second and fourth entries here (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=1697&hl=cosmological+expansion)

Betelgeuse
2004-Oct-09, 01:16 PM
Yes, I've read something during web based research about the comet theory. Comets do contain some of life's essential gasses, so it is possibly true.

About the alien thing, if the comet theory was true, I wouldn't consider myself as an alien - the comet would have helped bring life to this planet.

Jakenorrish
2004-Oct-29, 01:09 PM
I think its a combination of all of the things you've mentioned and then some more. One thing I believe is for certain, if life does exist anywhere else, It'll be few and far between and very different in appearance to life on Earth.

Duane
2004-Oct-29, 08:14 PM
Originally posted by ulgah@Sep 26 2004, 03:12 AM
ASEI, I hope you realize that was a spoof, I fully believe that life arose here, and chances of it rising again, somewhere else is nil. Ask any" REAL CHEMIST." But in the mean time we can continue dreaming, and thinking about our "space games."
Whatever do you mean? If you ask any "REAL CHEMIST" he/she will invariably tell you that the chemical conditions for life are fairly common. While you may believe that the chances of life appearing elsewhere are nil, that is most certainly not a scientific position.

To make the point, life arose on Earth. That means we know with an absolute certainly that life has arisen on 1 planet. Scientific logic dictates that if it has happened once, it could happen again. Any real chemist will tell you the same thing.

Matthew
2004-Oct-30, 08:07 AM
Although people are divided on how common the condition required for life are, the truth is is that we just don't know what the condiditons for life are. We may have a very good idea about what a carbon based life form needs, but we just don't have any clue (nor can we comprehend) what a non-carbon life form needs.