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Fraser
2004-Sep-28, 03:27 PM
SUMMARY: NASA's Mars Global Surveyor has delivered a series of new photographs of the Red Planet taken in new high detail, including images of the Mars Exploration rovers. By rolling the spacecraft as it travels to match the movement of Mars underneath, NASA engineers have figured out a clever way to increase the resolution of images taken by the spacecraft. It's now capable of resolving images as detailed as half as 1.5 metres across (4.9 feet) - a threefold improvement. Mars Global Surveyor has been systematically mapping Mars since it arrived in 1999, and its latest mission extension beginning October 1 will keep it running into September 2006.

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Guest
2004-Sep-28, 03:48 PM
very nice :lol:

Eric Vaxxine
2004-Sep-28, 04:17 PM
:huh: Does this now mean that the images will be clearer or will they continue to fuzz-out (tamper) images which show information they do not want to release?

I maintain, we need privateers to map the Moon and Mars if we want to know what's really there.

lswinford
2004-Sep-28, 06:32 PM
What!? You don't trust NASA? :lol:

I'm positive I couldn't trust "privateers". Mark Twain once wrote about investing in a gold mine out in Nevada. He said "a gold mine is a hole in the ground surrounded by liars." If we left space exploration solely to privateers, then I'm absolutely positive that it will turn into something like all other great expansions and developments of humanity--frought with sensational hyperbole erected upon a grain of truth. Since I don't fully trust NASA either, how about a fair dose of both? :D

StarLab
2004-Sep-28, 07:06 PM
I think the use of Surveyor is a fine example of planning ahead, and the Spirit and Opportunity rovers are a fine example of Planning Ahead by Sheer Dumb Luck.

Duane
2004-Sep-28, 07:38 PM
I wonder if the resolution is enough to see the wreckage in the areas where Beagle and Mars Polar Lander are thought to have crashed. It would certainly be helpful to both agencieds to see exactly how they ended up, especially when it is thought that either or both might have survived the impact realtively intact.

StarLab
2004-Sep-28, 07:42 PM
Hmm.....yeah, I never thought about that before - good idea! ;) :lol: B) :D :)

haute
2004-Sep-28, 08:48 PM
:ph34r: so why doesn't NASA use something (HUBBLE?) to take a picture of the Appollo landing sites on the moon? It would do nice to dispell those annoying nay sayers!

Duane
2004-Sep-28, 11:29 PM
Because the resolution isn't high enough haute. Need to have something in orbit to see something that small.

Tom2Mars
2004-Sep-29, 02:31 AM
fraser, re-
By rolling the spacecraft as it travels to match the movement of Mars underneath, NASA engineers have figured out a clever way to increase the resolution of images taken by the spacecraft

Most photographers, especially sports and animal life photographers, would recognize this technique as "panning".

I'm surprised they haven't done this before, unless it uses up too much fuel as reaction mass, but I suppose reaction wheels(gyros) should be able to provide the motion.

Eric Vaxxine
2004-Sep-30, 11:32 AM
Originally posted by haute@Sep 28 2004, 08:48 PM
:ph34r: so why doesn't NASA use something (HUBBLE?) to take a picture of the Appollo landing sites on the moon? It would do nice to dispell those annoying nay sayers!






Why aren't there ANY pictures of the moon by Hubble? They will tell say it's because the moon is too bright, the instrument too sensitive.
Clementine should have proved something, but it's images are...!!...dodgy(to use an English phrase)
Check out Moon anomalies by Clementine on the web.

I agree that sometimes privateers are mercenary. But I can forsee privateers publishing 'interesting anomalous' photo's etc for MONEY. SO at least we would know what has been going on in our solar neighbourhood before we were space farers, possibly before we were born.