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Fraser
2004-Sep-30, 05:35 PM
SUMMARY: Here's an interesting opportunity for all you US readers. NASA is looking to recruit more of its Solar System Ambassadors. These are volunteers from around the US and Puerto Rico who help build awareness and enthusiasm for space and astronomy. NASA supplies the educational material, videos, etc, and puts you in contact with various mission scientists. You've got to put on at least four public outreach events a year. Sounds like a good trade if you're a space enthusiast. They're accepting applications until October 15th, so if this is an interest to you, visit their website.

Fraser Cain
Publisher
Universe Today

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

StarLab
2004-Sep-30, 08:43 PM
D'you think someone my age (16 yrs. old) could qualify?

Darth Maestro
2004-Sep-30, 09:44 PM
I don't think it would matter. You should give it a try.

Greg Redfern
2004-Sep-30, 10:54 PM
Hi Fraser,

I have been an SSA for 2 years and it is a great opportunity to bring the solar system (and beyond) to the public.

You have a great service in your Universe Today emails. Thank you for including the SSAS.

All the best,

Greg Redfern
JPL NASA Solar System Ambassador
http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ambassador/index.html
International Meteorite Collectors Association #5781
http://www.imca.cc
Member Meteoritical Society
http://www.meteoriticalsociety.org/

StarLab
2004-Sep-30, 11:06 PM
Greg- I'm still in eleventh grade at school. I live in West Hollywood, I go to a school around Bel Air, and I'm just wondering how "involved" I could get if I apply for this position...how much effort is required of me... :unsure:

damienpaul
2004-Sep-30, 11:37 PM
go for it, Starlab!

antoniseb
2004-Oct-01, 12:29 AM
I just applied.
I'll let you know if they ever get back to me.
They wanted five references!

StarLab
2004-Oct-01, 04:26 AM
Yeah, I've already assembled some replies.

So Anton, what were your four ideas for planned events?

( I think I may have an advantage over some, as I actually live near the Griffith Observatory, the California Science Center, and the JPL itself)

Aqualung
2004-Oct-01, 06:23 AM
I have known about this for a long time and still do not understand why this should be limited only to US Citizens.

After all, modern Astronomy started in europe!

:angry:

antoniseb
2004-Oct-01, 10:08 AM
Originally posted by Aqualung@Oct 1 2004, 06:23 AM
After all, modern Astronomy started in europe!
That depends on what you call modern astronomy. This doesn't disagree with your main point, but innovations in how to do astronomy have happened all over the world.

antoniseb
2004-Oct-01, 10:12 AM
Originally posted by StarLab@Oct 1 2004, 04:26 AM
what were your four ideas for planned events?
I was pretty non-specific there. I thought I could develop them later, and basically mentioned library events, and stuff at the boy-scout, girl-scout level.

Aqualung
2004-Oct-01, 07:55 PM
Originally posted by antoniseb+Oct 1 2004, 10:08 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (antoniseb @ Oct 1 2004, 10:08 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-Aqualung@Oct 1 2004, 06:23 AM
After all, modern Astronomy started in europe&#33;
That depends on what you call modern astronomy. This doesn&#39;t disagree with your main point, but innovations in how to do astronomy have happened all over the world. [/b][/quote]
By modern astronomy I mean observations using optical and radio telescopes. Also the use of mathematics to confirm the observed results.

kjargirl
2004-Oct-01, 08:27 PM
I was selected as an Ambassador last December, and it&#39;s been a great experience. It&#39;s just an outstanding program. The director, Kay Ferrari, is wonderful and she&#39;s excellent at keeping the Ambassadors updated on all the missions going on, and makes sure we get the latest news so that we can pass it on to the people in our communities. If you are excited about space and love to share your passion with others, I would highly recommend applying to become an SSA.

I&#39;ve visited schools as an Ambassador, and the kids just love hearing about all the possiblities that space exploration offers. Some may think its just a slogan --"To inspire as only NASA can..." but from my experience, its true. Its fun to see the wide-eyed wonder of children, and know that their inspiration is our future.

Nancy Atkinson

EagleUK
2004-Oct-01, 10:36 PM
Originally posted by Aqualung@Oct 1 2004, 06:23 AM
I have known about this for a long time and still do not understand why this should be limited only to US Citizens

Most people seem to think that NASA is like the United Nations, but it&#39;s not. It&#39;s a US institution paid for by US tax dollars. That&#39;s why they focus on US citizens, and this seems fair to me. Having said this, NASA does cooperate with other countries on a fairly wide scale across most of their programs, so might be willing to help get a program started elsewhere.

Other countries, particularly in Europe, could offer the same sort of program if they wished. There probably are similar resources in the European Space Agency and other organizations. It will takes someone interested enough to put a proposal together and sell it to the ESA management. Perhaps you&#39;re the person to do this?

Let us know if you decide to do this and need support. I live in the UK, and would love to participate in something like this.

V/R,

EagleUK

Greg Redfern
2004-Oct-02, 02:40 PM
Greg- I&#39;m still in eleventh grade at school. I live in West Hollywood, I go to a school around Bel Air, and I&#39;m just wondering how "involved" I could get if I apply for this position...how much effort is required of me...


It depends totally on you. I do a lot of TV and radio here in Washington DC as well as public speaking at a variety of forums. The key is to pick a venue (mission) you are interested in and learn all you can about it so you can "promote" that particular mission. I am fortunate to have been involved in astronomy/space exploration for over 4 decades and have authored over a 1000 newspaper/magazine articles....but it is all a labor love,

Greg

kjargirl
2004-Oct-03, 11:14 PM
Starlab-
I would echo what Greg said, that you can do the types of things that appeal to you or that you feel comfortable doing (speaking to young people, or adults, or doing rocket launches, or star parties, etc) but the main thing is to be prepared, do your homework, and know the mission you are talking about inside and out. Because there are sure to be people in your audience who will ask some very technical questions, you need to either be prepared to answer those questions, or be able to point them in the right direction to find the answer. The Ambassador program will provide you the tools to do the presentations, but ultimately you have to do the work and be prepared.

Most of the people you run into as an Ambassador are very supportive of NASA, but you also have to be ready for moon hoax people, or someone who asks you to justify why NASA spent &#036;264 million to capture a few atoms of the solar wind and then the parachute didn&#39;t work. Again, you have to be prepared.

Being an Ambassador is a time commitment, as you have to take part in the training sessions (1-2 a month) and do at least 4 presentations a year. That may not sound like a lot, but if you are going to school or working, have family committments and already have a lot on your plate, I don&#39;t want you to think that being an Ambassador doesn&#39;t take time and committment. If you are doing something like a powerpoint presentation, you can spend major hours getting everything together and preparing. But as Greg said, its a labor of love, and for me, its been a great experience.
Nancy

suntrack2
2004-Oct-04, 01:08 PM
Mr.Fraser Sir,
warm regards,

well i am living in india and doing service i think this is not for me, though i am enthusiastic &#33;

sunil