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Fraser
2004-Nov-10, 05:57 PM
SUMMARY: New images released from the Spitzer space telescope are helping scientists understand how clouds of gas and dust come together to form new solar systems. One image shows a dim object at the heart of an icy cloud, which resembles our own early solar system. This object isn't a star... yet, but it could be a young failed star, a brown dwarf, a star which has yet to ignite, or something else entirely. In another image, Spitzer looked at the centre of a dusty disc around a young star and found icy building blocks that will eventually form into planets - similar to how our planets looked when they were only a few hundred thousand years old.

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

om@umr.edu
2004-Nov-11, 12:45 AM
Interesting.

The Spitzer Space Telescope seems to be trying to find evidence to support a questionable model for the formation of stars with planets.

We used to think an interstellar cloud formed our solar system. But many, many measurements since 1960 indicate that hot supernova debris, rather than an interstellar cloud of gas and dust, formed the solar system.

This news story says that NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope is now "helping astronomers better understand how stars form out of thick clouds of gas and dust".

The story goes on to say that "astronomers have detected a faint, star-like object in the least expected of places -- a "starless core.""

"The object defies all models of star formation".

With kind regards,

Oliver
http://www.umr.edu/~om

Janice
2004-Nov-11, 03:35 AM
:blink: FASCINATING :blink:

All the Best,
Janice.

antoniseb
2004-Nov-11, 01:50 PM
Originally posted by om@umr.edu@Nov 11 2004, 12:45 AM
The Spitzer Space Telescope seems to be trying to find evidence to support a questionable model for the formation of stars with planets.
The way I read the story, it is succeeding. Don't be dismayed, Your unusual theory never claimed that all stars and planets formed from single supernova events.

Duane
2004-Nov-11, 08:09 PM
Furthermore, many many studies have provided strong evidence that the cloud from which the sun formed was the beneficiary of several supernovas, not just one, as well as atmospheric shedding by red-giant and Wolfe-Rayet stars.

So "we" still think the sun formed formed from an interstellar cloud. There are a few radicals out there that think they may have a different answer, but the evidence they give to support their theories are pretty slim.

Guest
2004-Nov-12, 11:28 AM
We even very probably know, where is that source of matter for forming our solar system
It is Orion Nebula....-formed from supernovas debrises...
Why?
Sun moves in direction +-from Orion nebula.
That Champagne ejection from that place speeds new stars planets toward us...
Orion nebula is closest born place of planets, stars...
Gravity of Orion nebula (more than 30000Ms..100000?... with dark matter) is comparable with gr. force of closest stars....!!!
The oldest myths, writings speak about Orion, that it is birth place of stars...of our Sun, planets

antoniseb
2004-Nov-12, 11:42 AM
Originally posted by Guest@Nov 12 2004, 11:28 AM
We even very probably know, where is that source of matter for forming our solar system. It is Orion Nebula.
Actually Paval, we passed throught the Orion Nebula very recently compared to the date that the Sun and planets must have formed. A nebula like Orion? Yes. The Orion Nebula, almost certainly not.

GOURDHEAD
2004-Nov-12, 12:05 PM
How many times may we have passed through the Orion nebula? How old is it? Although I don't expect the MW nor the objects in it to orbit like a solid object nor pieces attached to one, I do expect very small relative angular velocities for objects within a few lightyears of the same semi-major axes and orbital eccentricities. If the solar system is thus related to the Orion nebula (how would we know), do we know enough about the proper motion of the Orion nebula and how related such proper motion is to current transients in the characteristics of the orbits of each?

antoniseb
2004-Nov-12, 12:53 PM
Originally posted by GOURDHEAD@Nov 12 2004, 12:05 PM
How many times may we have passed through the Orion nebula? How old is it?
Star forming regions like the Orion Nebula are not thought to last for billions of years. I have no handy reference to back this up, sorry.

Duane
2004-Nov-12, 06:25 PM
Gourdhead, we passed through it at least once, approximately 25 million years ago (see this from Sun's Path through the Galaxy (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=2745), which includes a link to a paper antoniseb found). I do not know how long the nebula would persist, certainly on the order of several 10's or maybe 100's of millions of years, so it's possible we have passed through it more than once--possible, but I would think unlikely.

Certainly it appears the solar system has passed through many nebulas in it's lifetime, although frankly it has spent much more time between the arms.