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suntrack2
2004-Nov-29, 11:58 AM
when big-bang came into existence can anyone assume that how many bombs power was there during explosion of the big bang?
viz. how many hydrogen bombs power, and atomic too?
can any one difine this explosion in terms of the power ejected through that big explosion. Before that may be the solar system was nearer in distance, different in size, different in properties, different in structures, different in volumes, different in gravity, different in colours, different in metalic, stone, clay, dust, regidity and everything. hence my question is simple that "bigbang=how many bomb power?

sunil

Jakenorrish
2004-Nov-29, 12:50 PM
At a guess I reckon that nobody would be able to answer that accurately, but you never know!

GOURDHEAD
2004-Nov-29, 01:51 PM
Before that maybe the solar system was nearer in distance, different in size, different in properties, different in structures, different in volumes, different in gravity, different in colours, different in metalic, stone, clay, dust, regidity and everything.
"Before that" there was no solar system to have properties. The current concensus is that the BB was initiated 13.7 billion years ago while the solar system was initiated less than 6 billion years ago. The MW may be less than 12 billion years old.


can anyone assume that how many bombs power was there during explosion of the big bang?
You frame the question such that I am tempted to wonder what strange level of evil lurks in your mind. A less motive revealing way to frame the question would be: How many joules of energy? Then you could secretly convert that value to "standard bombs". The actual answer defies computation; let's see whether we can "put a lid on it".

To get to power we need to guess at the number of joules "springing forth during that first second". This requires a guess at the size of the universe after one second and a further guess at the density. Expressing the density in terms of atomic mass units per cubic centimeter and multiplying it by the total number of meters in our assumed volume, 0.5 times the square of the velocity of light and planck's constant puts us well on our way. Then we multiply this by a fudge factor.
1. Volume of the universe less than that of a sphere of 5 light year radius.
2. Density less than 10^40 grams per cubic centimeter.
3. Planck's constant and the speed of light same as current values.
4. Fudge factor for creation of sapcetime and to power its expansion and to
include the 99.9998% leptonic energy. Say 10^7.
5. Divide by the number of watts in a "standard bomb".
Although I don't recommend it, on your next slow day you can select various values for the terms described above with a reasonable expectation of computing a number that is larger than the number of bombs equivalent to the power of the BB.

alainprice
2004-Nov-29, 04:39 PM
I don't think your question ever can be answered.

Nuclear bombs are built up upon the current laws of physics. Those same laws do not apply to the first few moments after the BB. The big bang cannot be directly translated into a X tons of TNT amount.

eburacum45
2004-Dec-01, 08:39 PM
Actually the answer is given on this page;

http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astr...rs/980211b.html (http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/980211b.html)

the answer is 9.5 x 10e53 Megatons of TNT.
The biggest bomb ever built was 100 megatons; so that is
1,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000 bombs.

Sphinx
2004-Dec-01, 09:43 PM
so would all of those bombs have exploded at the same time or would they have been more like a cluster? Just kidding, there's no need to answer to that. Shouldn't they be able to estimate the amount of energy there was in the big bang from the left over microwaves that it produced? I mean, we have a good idea of how much there is now and also an approximate time of when it took place. Isn't that enough to approximate the amount of energy needed to obtain an explosion with similar results?

astromark
2004-Dec-01, 10:12 PM
If all the matter of the universe was in one place. It would be a very larg BANG. that converted all that energy into matter. After all it was about 13.5billion years ago, and we are still expanding away from that explosion. KAABOOM.

alainprice
2004-Dec-02, 03:14 AM
Originally posted by eburacum45@Dec 1 2004, 03:39 PM
Actually the answer is given on this page;

http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astr...rs/980211b.html (http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/980211b.html)

the answer is 9.5 x 10e53 Megatons of TNT.
The biggest bomb ever built was 100 megatons; so that is
1,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000, 000,000,000,000,000 bombs.
That's based on the assumption that the total mass-energy of the universe is equal to the critical density. It also assumes that this alone represents all energy in the big bang.

eburacum45
2004-Dec-02, 08:41 AM
I know. There should be big quotation marks around that figure, as it contains so many half truths and impossibilities. For a start, we don't know how big the universe is outside our event horizon;
and the mass of that many bombs would exceed the mass of the early universe as quoted.

suntrack2
2004-Dec-02, 01:57 PM
thanks ebura, sphinx and others,
if we crack a small craker then the hearing frequency works in normal course, if we crack a big one the the frequency change, and noise we cannot bare to hear,
for this time we can assume only that what it was to be? sometime it appears like replay's to be and not to be? so how far this theory comes of bigbang? this is also a big question.