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ChromeStar
2004-Dec-18, 05:19 PM
Does any one here wonder how, know how or of new techniques to find life? :huh:

I opened this thread to allow for debate on the topic.

i'll start with spectrophy:

it has been used to find stars - to find there size and composition and now it's being used to find the composition of planets atmospheres in order to find wheather it can support life. :)

Bobunf
2004-Dec-18, 11:13 PM
It seems to me that in the next twenty years we can expect many new techniques and greatly enhanced versions of established techniques to be used in attempts to detect evidence of life both in our solar system and around other stars.

Advances in biology should give a better handle on how life originates, develops, and what environmental conditions are possible, and not possible, as habitats.

Chemical laboratories will be landed in promising places on Mars. Detailed monitoring of the Martian atmosphere should be able to reveal evidence of many kinds of metabolism. I’m not so confident that humans will be nearly so effective in looking for life in the Jovian moons any time soon; the difficulties are so much greater.

Around other stars I think we will use greatly enhanced techniques like interferometry, transits, gravitational lensing, and direct imaging to tease out much more information from the electromagnetic radiation emerging from extra-solar planets, and satellites of those planets.

We will be able to find most terrestrial sized planets and satellites within 50 light years of Earth and many even further; determine orbits, and age and temperature ranges. We should be able to detect water vapor, oxygen, ozone and methane in their atmospheres, and make estimates of the quantities involved.

What would we make of a planet that was the right age, size and temperature, with a stable orbit, water vapor, and biologically indicative amounts of oxygen, ozone and methane in its atmosphere?

I think we’d get to work on identifying the signature of chlorophyll.

Bob

johnnyGfosho
2005-Jan-17, 08:59 AM
We will continure to look for life on other celestial bodies, but in my opinion we arent going to find it anytime soon..dont get me wrong i do think that there is life out there without a doubt..it seems unreal that with the size and amount of bodies in the universe (celestial bodies those r) that there woudnt be atleast one more that has life somewhere on it...with the number of places we could look if we had the technology the odds of finding another planet with life on it seem like theyd be greatly in our favor..but im only 14 and im new to astronomy so feel free to correct anything i am posting, it will only help me out in the long run anyways..

Johnny G :)

Ola D.
2005-Jan-17, 11:14 AM
Originally posted by Bobunf@Dec 18 2004, 11:13 PM
It seems to me that in the next twenty years we can expect I think we’d get to work on identifying the signature of chlorophyll.


Do you mean we should use the rate of photosynthesis to discover the composition of a planet's atmosphere, or use plants as a medium? I hope I didn't misunderstand your last point.

suntrack2
2005-Jan-17, 01:12 PM
chromestar, your navigation in this regard will be done fruitful, in my opinion there is life in the universe besides earth, but the extra terestrial intelligence, how far such life is more advance than us, that's a matter, but some time i think that if they have an advance technique than we then uptill they must have to come on earth to visit, becuase they are also in such process to search the life in the universe.
what do you think, chrome'

sunil

Bobunf
2005-Jan-17, 04:06 PM
Ola D. said “Do you mean we should use the rate of photosynthesis to discover the composition of a planet's atmosphere...”

We might look for chlorophyll, after we’ve discovered an excess of oxygen or ozone, as a means of confirming the biological origin of that excess.

Terrestrial Planet Finder will, for stars within about 45 light years of Earth, to quote NASA’s website, “measure the size, temperature, and placement of planets as small as the Earth in the habitable zones of distant solar systems…will allow atmospheric chemists and biologists to use the relative amounts of gases like carbon dioxide, water vapor, ozone and methane to find whether a planet someday could or even now does support life.” The mission is scheduled for launch in two parts, one around 2014, and the other before 2020.

The European Space Agency’s Darwin, scheduled for launch around 2015, will be able, to quote ESA’s website, “to detect and analyse Earth-like worlds, to detect atmospheres on these planets and to search for gases that can indicate life.”

To quote Universe Today’s July 12, 2004 story about the search for New Earths, “In just a decade, astronomers should be able to supply us with an answer to one of the most fundamental questions humans have asked themselves... are we alone?…there's a chance that in 10 years, you'll be reading news that life has been discovered orbiting another star”

Which, I think, is a little optimistic. But certainly by 2020 it’s possible that we will have discovered several planets of the right size, distance from their star, and with water vapor and extreme excesses of oxygen, ozone or methane in their atmospheres.”

Sure sounds like life, but what do we do for confirmation? What’s the next step? Detecting chlo-rophyll would be pretty convincing evidence that life had, in fact, been discovered.

Bob

Sphinx
2005-Jan-17, 04:43 PM
...but is plant matter limited to utilizing chlorophyl to process this oxygen? I'm no biologist but don't we have to consider the possibility of vegitation and/or other organisms of finding other ways of processing other gases (or even oxygen) in other ways that aren't as easily identified by us? I guess I realize that most scientists understand this but that it brings forth to many variables and would make it much more difficult to detect/understand. So, we look for signs of life as we understand it using our own world as a model which is why we look for earth sized structures with similar composition and tempratures as our own. This is limiting in our search for life but will be the easiest to identify given our limited ability to search, correct?

ChromeStar
2005-Jan-17, 06:15 PM
Hi sunil

well think if there is other life that is searching like we are, they would wait until the time is right to meet us. if they are more advanced they would most probably know this.

Ola D.
2005-Jan-18, 12:44 AM
Sure sounds like life, but what do we do for confirmation? What’s the next step? Detecting chlo-rophyll would be pretty convincing evidence that life had, in fact, been discovered.

Thanks for the clarification.
I think if chlorophyl or other photosynthetic pigments were detected at this stage you're suggesting, it'll probably be present in photosynthetic bacteria or protoctists, like Euglena.

GOURDHEAD
2005-Jan-18, 03:45 PM
Review this. (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=5952&hl=)