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kdhrocks
2004-Dec-29, 06:45 PM
Our troops desperately need our mental capabilities tuned inward for a small amount of time. We need to design, manufacture and deliver the next generation balistic armor that can be used on their humvees as well as their own bodies. The currant bolt on armor weighs so much that when installed the extra weight destroys the suspension and overloads the drive train of their only transportation. I say that if we can protect our men in space then we should also be able to protect all of our troops that daily go in harms way! I know that this group has the time and brainpower to aid their brothers and sisters, husbands and wives, and especilly the next generations fathers and mothers. Please do so.
Dave

Chook
2004-Dec-29, 07:16 PM
Couldn't agree more!

Surely there is a massively strong lightweight material that may be used for kdhrock's purpose - to protect the lives of our military (and civilian service) personnel.

Carbon-fibre?

Sometimes I suspect that the priorities of military spending can be improved. Surely the protection of lives should top of the list.

kdhrocks
2004-Dec-29, 11:04 PM
I am sorry to say that is not the case! Money is the bottom line.
Dave

Duane
2004-Dec-30, 12:16 AM
New nanotechnologies show alot of promise towards better and lighter armour, but it's a ways down the road at this point. I think they are using the best available to them at this time, they just haven't prioritized it, leaving too many without the protection that is already available.

Spend your time contacting your various federal representatives about the issue. It is way more time effective, and if enough voters say "do it or you're gone" they will do it.

kashi
2004-Dec-30, 12:50 AM
Perhaps not starting wars in the first place would be a better approach. You wouldn't need any armour at all then.

Alaskan
2005-Feb-16, 03:14 PM
Right, and keeping mankind out of space would negate the need for armour too. Good thinking.

jimmy
2005-Feb-17, 03:13 AM
(giggle)

solitonmanny
2005-Feb-17, 10:33 AM
There may be new types of armour available but the authorities, with all the speed of a sprinting glacier will only distribute the system when the civil servants have all the "T"'s crossed and the "i"'s dotted.

The need for some sort of armour for the services is obvious, what is not widely acknowledged outside the space "community" is the need for a lightweight and extremely tough material (armour by any other name) for the vessels in which to traverse between planets (always hopeful!!).

A number of years ago I read an article in Popular Science (I know...not always the most accurate way of researching a topic), anyway this article was about two very bright American engineers who came up with a surface treatment to reduce friction between surfaces, ball bearings, ballraces, etc.
The process involved a gas diffusion chamber in which the material was introduced to the vapour, the material was then removed, then the coating was hardened using heat (I'm going back about 10-12 years here peeps, so bear with me...OK?).

After treatment the coating was nearly as tough as diamond and nearly as slick; in fact slick was the name given to the process at the time of the interview.

Now, if carbon fibre were to be treated in this manner and consequently heat treated, could this produce a lightweight and very tough type of armour?Since raw carbon fibre is fairly porous and has an open weave, could the gas be infused as opposed to just a surface treatment?If at all feasible, this could lead to a very lightweight material for space vehicles, anyone out there want to give it a try?

Best to all and take care,

Manny
The Newbie

piersdad
2005-Feb-17, 12:56 PM
quite often old and new technology dont meet
and the old tech is lost in some library.
carbon fibre is very smooth at microscopic level

the astronaughts suits are armoured by many layers of strong plastics and as each layer is penitrated by a micrometeor it disperces the energy over an increasing larger surface.
so perhaps they have sufficient and have already progressed from the older discovery

solitonmanny
2005-Feb-18, 10:50 AM
Piersdad,

Not an old technology at all, the coating applied to ball bearings (Don't these have to be fairly smooth, even at the molecular level?) reduced wear and tear by introducing a material layer between the ball bearings and tha ball races.

The design of the space suit is based on artillery ballistics, applying ballistic armour theory but using different materials; Hard/soft/space/hard/soft etc.

Anyhow, many thanks for replying so rapidly to a newbie's query.

Best to all and take care,

Manny
The Newbie