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View Full Version : Blazars - How much total mass?



skipperjohn
2005-Jan-24, 11:19 PM
I read a new article about "Blazars" and that matter (a considerable amount of it -Jupiter-sized blobs of hot gas) were apparently detected moving at a speed very close to light speed (99.99999999999999999999 percent).

I'm not sure how many of these masses are travelling around our universe, but wouldn't a large number of these masses moving at such a high rate of speed account for a goodly portion of the total mass in the universe?

antoniseb
2005-Jan-25, 04:30 AM
Originally posted by skipperjohn@Jan 24 2005, 11:19 PM
very close to light speed (99.99999999999999999999 percent)
If Jupiter mass objects were moving at that speed, they would ceretainly contain most of the energy in the universe, but, you are misremembering the speed.

skipperjohn
2005-Jan-25, 09:58 PM
The article I read about Blazars can be accessed at the following url:
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/blaz...eed_050118.html (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/blazing_speed_050118.html)

I just cited the speed from what had been listed in that news item about Blazars.

It definitely states 99. (followed by 20 9's)

That's pretty close to the speed of light.

alainprice
2005-Jan-25, 11:57 PM
It states that is the speed of cosmic rays hitting the atmosphere. These cosmic rays come from 'space', not visible bodies.

It says that blazars travel at roughly 0.999 times the speed of the light.

Duane
2005-Jan-26, 12:06 AM
Originally posted by skipperjohn@Jan 25 2005, 02:58 PM
The article I read about Blazars can be accessed at the following url:
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/blaz...eed_050118.html (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/blazing_speed_050118.html)

I just cited the speed from what had been listed in that news item about Blazars.

It definitely states 99. (followed by 20 9's)

That's pretty close to the speed of light.
Cosmic rays (ie protons) are the objects accelerated to that speed. The large blobs of material screaming away from the blazar are slower--only 99.9%. It's a vanishing small difference, but it is an important diffference when talking about light speed.

skipperjohn
2005-Jan-26, 10:44 PM
QUOTE (skipperjohn @ Jan 25 2005, 02:58 PM)
The article I read about Blazars can be accessed at the following url:
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/blaz...eed_050118.html

I just cited the speed from what had been listed in that news item about Blazars.

It definitely states 99. (followed by 20 9's)

That's pretty close to the speed of light.



Cosmic rays (ie protons) are the objects accelerated to that speed. The large blobs of material screaming away from the blazar are slower--only 99.9%. It's a vanishing small difference, but it is an important diffference when talking about light speed.

Yes, I certainly misread the speed of the jupiter-sized blobs. However, even at 99.9 percent of the speed of light, wouldn't such an object exhibit a tremendous mass?

Because there are black holes that are propelling jets of gas in directions other than towards us (I'm not sure what they would be called - Blazars are the ones expelling jets towards the earth), there is a lot of apparent total mass from these speedy big blobs.

Could they be some of the lost mass in the universe that is currently assigned to black matter?

zephyr46
2005-Feb-19, 04:14 AM
I had never even heard of 'Blazers', and had only just read about Bursters (http://www.astronomical.org/portal/modules/wfsection/article.php?articleid=140).

As I understand cosmic rays, they are atoms stripped of electrons up to Iron, these plasma 'blobs' sound like massive cosmic ray clouds?? No neutrons?

Not the sort of thing you'd like to run into I guess.

skipperjohn
2005-Feb-19, 04:47 AM
I had never even heard of 'Blazers', and had only just read about Bursters.

As I understand cosmic rays, they are atoms stripped of electrons up to Iron, these plasma 'blobs' sound like massive cosmic ray clouds?? No neutrons?

Not the sort of thing you'd like to run into I guess.

I don't know what the "blobs" consist of, but the article seems to say that they are at least as massive as a large planet. If they are using the word massive to mean a large mass, the blobs moving at .999 light speed would have to exhibit a monstrous effective mass.

What would happen to our solar system if one of these blobs were to come our solar system? They would, of course, pass by quickly, but the mass of the blobs would be so large that they must have some effect.

Worst case, a blob could hit a planet or the sun directly. Would it be a sun destroyer?

zephyr46
2005-Feb-19, 05:29 AM
I had the impression the plasmer was made of protons, if so, I would have thought a strong magnetic field would smudge it?

Traveling so close to the speed of light, I think light takes 8 hours to reach Pluto from the sun? So, I guess we would see it, or at least feel it B) if it ran into us??

skipperjohn
2005-Feb-20, 12:02 AM
I had the impression the plasmer was made of protons, if so, I would have thought a strong magnetic field would smudge it?

Traveling so close to the speed of light, I think light takes 8 hours to reach Pluto from the sun? So, I guess we would see it, or at least feel it cool.gif if it ran into us??

You're possibly right about the composition of the mass (I certainly don't know), and whether a strong magnetic field would affect it.

However, if the mass wasn't detected until it got to Pluto's distance from the Earth, the mass would arrive about a half minute after the light reached earth.

If such a mass was 100 light years away from the Earth, and heading towards the Earth, the light from the mass would arrive at the Earth 100 years later. The mass itself would arrive a little over a month after that. That still wouldn't be much advance notice of the mass (and you'd have to be looking in the right direction).