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View Full Version : Discussion: Signs of Underground Life on Mars



Z28Jerry
2005-Feb-16, 11:38 PM
http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/mars...ife_050216.html (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/mars_life_050216.html)

Duane
2005-Feb-17, 12:29 AM
Hmm, very interesting.

Josh
2005-Feb-17, 04:21 AM
Yes, very interesting indeed. None of us are going to be convinced until we see pictures of the criters or microbes or whatever. Still, very very interesting. I look forward to the article in Nature.

Midnight_Toker
2005-Feb-17, 04:22 AM
that is interesting, too bad the rovers are probably nowhere near any of these caves, sometimes i forget that mars is an entire planet, and it would take days, months or years for those rovers to get anywhere. I guess for the next mission we should thinka bout sending a remote conrolled lowrider with nos and big *** v8 engine with chrome headers.

kashi
2005-Feb-17, 06:53 AM
Great find Z28Jerry! I'm definitely looking forward to reading the full article in Nature.

solitonmanny
2005-Feb-17, 09:24 AM
To all at UT,

With reference to your post about Mars and the postulated/possible signs of life, I notice that the reporter(s) were very careful not to attribute any absolute quotes. Very sensible really, the two scientists seem to me, to be suggesting that there may be a biologogical reason for the methane outgassing, which may or may not, include active life (on a very small scale, obviously).

Thats the boring part over with !

What on Earth (oops!!.. sorry!), let me rephrase that...what on Mars could this form of life possibly look like?

If anything will make the majority of people on this mudball take more of an interest in space, surely this event (if proven!) will do so.

Best to all and take care,

Manny
The Newbie
P.S
This is still the friendliest and most open site I have ever encountered...keep it guys!

Z28Jerry
2005-Feb-17, 10:44 AM
Manny, you will NOT find a better group of people online. Not only are most around here very kind, but most have a decent head on thier shoulders as well. I learn so much from this site.

Check out the astrophotography forum, great stuff there!

kashi
2005-Feb-17, 12:23 PM
Hey solitonmanny. Haven't seen you around here before. Welcome to the forum.

You raise an interesting point about how the discovery of life on Mars (however "boring" it may look) would certainly help promote space exploration and astronomy to the general public. I think this itself is worthy of its own thread, so I've started one here: http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.p...?showtopic=6508 (http://www.universetoday.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=6508)

Fraser
2005-Feb-17, 06:23 PM
SUMMARY: NASA researchers believe they've found strong evidence that there could be underground life on Mars, huddled around pockets of liquid water. They haven't found the life directly, but instead have discovered a unique methane signature that matches similar environments here on Earth, such as subsurface areas around Rio Tinto, a red-stained river in Spain. In order to get confirmation, NASA would need to send a spacecraft to Mars capable of drilling into the ground - unfortunately, none are planned currently.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/article_2077.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

Midnight_Toker
2005-Feb-17, 06:36 PM
do they have any plans to investigate these caves yet? if so what are they?

Guest
2005-Feb-17, 07:33 PM
So we might have to send a Rover-digger on the next mission

Duane
2005-Feb-17, 07:35 PM
Originally posted by Midnight_Toker@Feb 17 2005, 11:36 AM
do they have any plans to investigate these caves yet? if so what are they?
No, this is very speculative stuff at this point. While the evidence may point to life, it has not been established and these "caves" or whatever have not yet been identified.

They might try to find them with Mars Science Laboratory, assuming that a site can be narrowed down from the methane data set, but that doesn't launch until 2009.

Buffy
2005-Feb-18, 10:14 AM
This news is very exciting!

Eric Vaxxine
2005-Feb-18, 12:58 PM
marsanomalyresearch.com more about life on mars. I keep suggesting this site as PART of our Mars discovery. The story by the officals is making sense now. It was only a matter of time before they reached 'possible' life.

Manchurian Taikonaut
2005-Feb-20, 10:38 AM
People at NASA are saying no


NASA says info on Mars is incorrect.

http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2005/feb/H...mars_claim.html


QUOTE
NASA does not have any observational data from any current Mars missions that supports this claim.



Dolores Beasley/Gretchen Cook-Anderson
Headquarters, Washington
(Phone: 202/358-1753/0836)
Feb. 18, 2005
RELEASE: 05-052

scorpio711
2005-Feb-20, 12:17 PM
I fully agree w/ Duane: it's definitely a candidate site for the MSL mission. Until then, may be work will be done to narrow down the right exact site, depth for necessary drilling, complementary research on Methane and Jarosite (the type of rocks found on Mars but also in Spain - Rio Negro environments, this time, hosting extremophiles) etc...
I hope that NASA will take this into account seriously. NASA statement is ambiguous, they say "News that NASA scientists have found strong evidence that life may exist on Mars is incorrect [... but] may help to formulate a strategy for how to search for martian life" !
wait and see for more details, anyway...
Scorpio

scorpio711
2005-Feb-20, 12:19 PM
By the way, I forgot... there is VERY interesting infos on the NASA plans re Mars exploration for the next 20 years at:
http://www.spaceref.com/news/viewsr.html?pid=15443
I downloaded all the material, it's really interesting !
Scorpio

suntrack2
2005-Feb-21, 11:11 AM
if the temperature rises on mars, the hot wind can melt down the ice caps and others so that the history may come forward in front of the world, that what mars is? is of? what was it? the life forms previously if so, etc.

lswinford
2005-Feb-23, 07:46 PM
I thought of this discussion after reading about some bacteria discovered deep in rocks below the ocean floor. Here is a link describing a primitive, and incredibly hardy, type of bacteria that might be one on the 'usual suspects' list for types of things to look for when the caves are explored or the planet is drilled. http://www.earthlife.net/prokaryotes/welcome.html