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Fraser
2005-Feb-21, 06:02 PM
SUMMARY: Thanks to data gathered by Cassini and Huygens, scientists know that Titan's atmosphere contains significant amounts of ammonia - and this chemical could be responsible for the weathering on the moon's surface. Researchers from the University of Arizona believe that Cassini will eventually find that Titan has a layer of liquid ammonia-and-water underneath a solid crust of water ice. It's this liquid ammonia that could be creating the cryovolcanic flows discovered by Cassini on its first close Titan flyby in 2004.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/ammonia_key_titan.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

lswinford
2005-Feb-21, 08:05 PM
Hydrogen escapes? I wonder what the escape energies are and whether the moon then becomes a veritable comet around Saturn with a hydrogen tail?

Hmm... :blink: maybe that might make it easier for future space-based humans to sweep up hydrogen and nitrogen from the Titan atmosphere to combine with the freed up oxygen from lunar and martian industrial activity. Some enterprising souls fixing up a bundle of spent upper stage rocket tanks with a solar sail, filled with distant gas or fluids and given a good gravitational assisted swing back down to help the chemical needs of mars or our moon, could they do it cheaper than us shipping it up from earth? :D

Guest
2005-Feb-21, 09:27 PM
So, if I understand correctly they didn't measure any ammonia, they only inferred it from areas that look like basaltic flows and the fact that they didn't detect any non-radiogenic Argon?
I say that's inferring quite a lot from almost nothing, why can't the areas that look like basaltic flows be basaltic flows? And why don't we directly detect ammonia? The prediction that ammonia will be found beneath an ice layer makes the idea even practically untestable. I think it's not very good science, although this article could be overly simplistic and missing some important data.

Cheers.

GOURDHEAD
2005-Feb-21, 10:47 PM
why can't the areas that look like basaltic flows be basaltic flows? Too cold on Titan for surface basalt to be produced.

Guest_contact
2005-Feb-22, 08:40 AM
A question:

The article says that


"Scientists believe that Titan has a rock core, surrounded by an overlying layer of rock-hard water ice."

So, is there a magnetic field surrounding Titan?
Did anyone pay attention whether research reported about this so far?
A liquid core is a prerequisite for a less or more mighty magnetic field, right?

VanderL
2005-Feb-22, 11:57 AM
why can't the areas that look like basaltic flows be basaltic flows?

Too cold on Titan for surface basalt to be produced.



Really, but lava is quite hot when it flows, does it really matter what the temperature at this time is, or would those basalt have flowqed recently?


Cheers.

contact
2005-Feb-22, 01:14 PM
Originally posted by Guest_contact@Feb 22 2005, 10:40 AM

"Scientists believe that Titan has a rock core, surrounded by an overlying layer of rock-hard water ice."

So, is there a magnetic field surrounding Titan?



I found an answer by myself at www.nineplanets.org (http://www.nineplanets.org/titan.html):


"Titan has no magnetic field and sometimes orbits outside Saturn's magnetosphere. It is therefore directly exposed to the solar wind."

SCHNECK
2005-Feb-22, 02:25 PM
Subsequent analysis of special calibration scans over Saturn crossing the galactic plane have showed the photon induced responsivity enhancement crossing the Galactic Plane as a function of the ecliptic longitude and CO to H2 mass conversion calibration in Titan atmosphere and its dark features (optical obscuration for clouds deficient in CO or so cold that CO falls to radiate at a frequence) on Titan surface.

Optical excitation of transition metal carbonyl complexes often results in breaking of metal-CO bond.Photochemical carbonyl dissociation concerns only the axial CO ligand that is coordinated perpendicularly.Photodissociation of a CO ligand generates highly reactive coordinately unsaturated species than can ever activate C-H bonds in hydrocarbons.