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Fraser
2005-Mar-08, 05:43 PM
SUMMARY: The quaint view that black holes gobble up matter quickly and efficiently is being replaced with observations and simulations that show a tremendous amount of violence and turbulence. Like too much water trying to get down a drain, matter backs up and creates an environment unique in the Universe. A new simulation from Johns Hopkins University shows how matter around a black hole can take on relativistic speeds, extreme densities, intense magnetic fields, all the while blasting out torrents of energy.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/black_hole_region_turbulent.html)

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antoniseb
2005-Mar-08, 07:12 PM
This was a nice article, though there are so many studies with computer models looking at the region near black holes that I wonder sometimes whether there wouldn't be some benefit to making a Excel spreadsheet or something that can show how each one is new or different.

Greg
2005-Mar-09, 05:42 AM
Considering what we are observing now about the behavior associated with SMBHs in the recent pass, there really isn't much that is surprising about the findings in this article. It is nice that the authors have determined the basic properties of the mechanisms that underlie the process of jet formation.
As far as determning which one of the models is of the most value, I would use the age-old scientific measuring stick of looking at the predictions each model makes of expected observations and see which one's are vindicated as accurate in the near future.

Matthew
2005-Mar-10, 07:23 AM
Originally posted by antoniseb@Mar 9 2005, 06:12 AM
This was a nice article, though there are so many studies with computer models looking at the region near black holes that I wonder sometimes whether there wouldn't be some benefit to making a Excel spreadsheet or something that can show how each one is new or different.
Many models take a look with different views on theoretical physics. There a those that are based on just classic and relative physics, others use quatum physics, with others using string theory.

wstevenbrown
2005-Mar-10, 03:47 PM
It just goes to show you that we are not used to places where the gravitational gradient is steep. Infalling material must encounter closer-in, already-orbiting material. Because of the steep gradient, the closer you get to the singularity, the closer orbital velocity approaches c.

Wanna bet those inner orbits are quantized, like the energy states of an atom, or of a 'fundamental' particle? Display wavelike behavior and interference?

Just a thought. ;) S