PDA

View Full Version : Discussion: Lightning Makes Radiation Belts Safer



Fraser
2005-Mar-09, 07:02 PM
SUMMARY: NASA scientists have finally worked out why there's a safe zone in the Earth's radiation belts, thousands of km above the surface. It turns out that lightning in the lower atmosphere generates radio waves which interact with radiation around the Earth, removing some of its energy and changing the direction of charged particles. This safe zone could be used as a haven by satellites to reduce the damage they take while operating in these regions.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/lightning_radiation_belts.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

lswinford
2005-Mar-10, 02:42 PM
Long ago, long before I was really able (lol, as if I were now), I tried tackling some reading about Nikoli Tesla's ideas on radio. He built some big radio station, on Long Island somewhere if I recall correctly. He was wanting to use the earth as a wave carrier instead of bouncing a signal through the air hoping to hit what would later be discovered to be the ionosphere, which is so dear to the hearts of shortwaver's. This is the guy who had long before transmitted electrical power through the air in Colorado, about 2/3 of a century before his time, and used to exhibit glowing, cordless, light tubes in a stage display, he was a bit of a ham of the theatrical sense, some five or ten years before the 'flourescent tube' was 'invented' by someone else.

This article makes me wonder if Tesla didn't have some sense of a broader harmonics tied to the phenomena described here. But then who would have thunk that the static charge exchanges between earth and sky had some resonating corallary in the radiation belts above and about this globe?

When we have weather fronts, with its associated fronts and static electrical display frictions, does that have some evidence in waves or distortions of the radiation belts? Would we look for ripples or zones of intensity in waves before and after the march of fronts across the hemispheres?

Then too, if there is the appearance that lightning on earth affects the radiation belts, could the reverse be true that solar disturbances and irregularities of solar winds cause perturbances in the radiation belts that have their corollary upwellings of meteorological 'energy' we call storm centers? A dark spot on the sun belches, and this is the mechanism that causes a string of thunderstorms to bubble up along the equator a few days later?

VanderL
2005-Mar-10, 04:23 PM
Hi lswinford,


his article makes me wonder if Tesla didn't have some sense of a broader harmonics tied to the phenomena described here. But then who would have thunk that the static charge exchanges between earth and sky had some resonating corallary in the radiation belts above and about this globe?

When we have weather fronts, with its associated fronts and static electrical display frictions, does that have some evidence in waves or distortions of the radiation belts? Would we look for ripples or zones of intensity in waves before and after the march of fronts across the hemispheres?

Then too, if there is the appearance that lightning on earth affects the radiation belts, could the reverse be true that solar disturbances and irregularities of solar winds cause perturbances in the radiation belts that have their corollary upwellings of meteorological 'energy' we call storm centers? A dark spot on the sun belches, and this is the mechanism that causes a string of
thunderstorms to bubble up along the equator a few days later?

What you are proposing here, is almost exactly the way the Electric Universe people think of the electrical interactions between Sun and Earth.
As you probably know there is a lenghty thread where EU ideas are discussed, this is one of the topics. I don't want to hijack this topic, so maybe we could discuss evidence of how this process is, or is not realistic, in the appropriate thread.

Cheers.

lswinford
2005-Mar-17, 08:48 PM
Actually, I wasn't doing much proposing. I picked up a rock, turned it over a couple of times, and said "I wonder...."

Thanks though, I'll look at that.

VanderL
2005-Mar-19, 02:37 PM
Actually, I wasn't doing much proposing. I picked up a rock, turned it over a couple of times, and said "I wonder...."

That's where science starts, looking at things and wondering....., eventually the idea must be formulated and verified, the scientific process in a nutshell.

Cheers.