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Fraser
2005-Mar-17, 06:50 PM
SUMMARY: Researchers have discovered evidence of recent glacier movements and volcanic eruptions on Mars, overturning the long-held opinion that it's a cold, dead world. As recently as 350,000 years ago, glaciers moved from Mars' poles to its tropics, covering the planet in sheets of ice. And several of Mars' giant volcanoes were active as recently as 2 million years ago. The heat from these volcanoes could sustain microbial life in underground pools of liquid water.

View full article (http://www.universetoday.com/am/publish/mars_geologically_active.html)

What do you think about this story? Post your comments below.

iantresman
2005-Mar-17, 08:33 PM
Glaciers moved from the poles to the tropics 350,000 to 4 million years ago,
Anyone know how these figures were arrived at? Why not 35,000 to 40 million years ago?

Regards,
Ian Tresman

Greg
2005-Mar-17, 10:21 PM
Somehow I am just not surprised by this finding. As soon as methane was discovered in the atmosphere, it became obvious to me that recent volcanism was undoubtedly responsible, either directly or indirectly. Since there is recent geologic activity this puts heat near ice which inevitably means a sustained supply of water for microogranisms (if they exist on the surface in certain locations.) Perhaps such microorganisms exist and produce additional methane, but I did not think that microogranisms were the sole supply of the methane as had been proported by some. This makes the planet much, much more interesting for future missions, and such locations of recent volcanism should now be ground zero for the next mission to Mars that looks for life.

Guest
2005-Mar-17, 11:31 PM
I get the feeling that life was invariably wiped out from off the martian surface at a time when ancient civilizations could have recorded an astronomical event involving Mars.

TuTone
2005-Mar-17, 11:55 PM
We just need to send man over to mars so they can search deep down in the caves. I bet there might be interesting stuff down there. I'm sure there's probably microbacterial life on Mars too, if not....forget about it! B)

TuTone
2005-Mar-18, 12:04 AM
Something just came to me right now.....what if we were to put a carcase on mars & let it sit there for about 1 year. What do you think would happen? If it were to rot away, would all the microorganisms on the body evolve to their habitat?

Things that make you go Hmmm... :mellow:

Eric Vaxxine
2005-Mar-18, 10:30 AM
Did anyone see the Hale crater anomalies? How much bacterial life would you need to produce the methane detected?

http://marsanomalyresearch.com/evidence-re...reline-life.htm (http://marsanomalyresearch.com/evidence-reports/2005/082/shoreline-life.htm)

Guest
2005-Mar-24, 11:02 PM
Originally posted by Eric Vaxxine@Mar 18 2005, 10:30 AM
Did anyone see the Hale crater anomalies? How much bacterial life would you need to produce the methane detected?

http://marsanomalyresearch.com/evidence-re...reline-life.htm (http://marsanomalyresearch.com/evidence-reports/2005/082/shoreline-life.htm)
I think they can expalin it through volcanism, ground activity other new theory but I'm not sure about the levels of Methane...what did the last press report say ?