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antoniseb
2005-Mar-25, 09:56 PM
Here's a link to a New Scientist story about high energy cosmic rays, and their sources.

Number of very high-energy gamma ray sources doubles (http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn7199)

Note toward the end of the story the discussion of sources, including what appears to be a reference to a possible new type of object currently called "dark accelerator" because it shoots high energy protons at us but doesn't emit substantial numbers of xrays or radio waves.

VanderL
2005-Mar-27, 11:20 PM
Note toward the end of the story the discussion of sources, including what appears to be a reference to a possible new type of object currently called "dark accelerator" because it shoots high energy protons at us but doesn't emit substantial numbers of xrays or radio waves.

Nor visible light, indeed these are very strange features that don't seem to be generated by a known class of object. The EU model tells us that most of the cosmic rays we detect on Earth are produced by the heliospheric double layer (DL), these "dark accelerators" could be analogous to these heliospheric DL's (which also lack emission in other frequencies), only much more powerful and apparently part of a different structure. This is an interesting find that makes me very curious on the speculations what it could be.

Cheers.

antoniseb
2005-Mar-27, 11:39 PM
Originally posted by VanderL@Mar 27 2005, 11:20 PM
The EU model tells us that most of the cosmic rays we detect on Earth are produced by the heliospheric double layer (DL), these "dark accelerators" could be analogous to these heliospheric DL's (which also lack emission in other frequencies), only much more powerful and apparently part of a different structure.
I am curious as to how you think that some EU universe structure could give off 10^18 eV protons without giving off substantial xrays, radio, IR, or optical.

Answer here if you like, or in the EU thread. For this particular phenomenon, an electromagnetic origin is not ruled out.